About these ads

Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Lincoln (2012)


Sorry guys, no vampires this time around.

Daniel Day-Lewis stars as the sixteenth President of the United States of America, also known as Abraham Lincoln, and paints a portrait of him during the tumultuous final months of his life, during which he fights to abolish slavery by putting forth an amendment in the House of Representatives.

For over a decade now, we have all been waiting for Steven Spielberg to deliver on his promise of an actual, Abraham Lincoln biopic and for awhile there, it was going to happen. Actually, at one-point, Liam Neeson was supposed to star as Honest Abe but Neeson himself even declared he was “too old” for the role, even though Daniel Day is five years younger than him, but hey, if Oskar Schindler says no, Oskar Schindler means no. Thankfully though, after all of this time, Spielberg delivers on his promise and gives us a movie that isn’t quite the epic biopic we were all expecting out there. Hell, it’s the farthest thing from actually.

Instead of going for the full-scale, sweeping epic idea that he has gone with on such pictures like War Horse, Saving Private Ryan, and Schindler’s List, Spielberg takes a step-back and decides to play it down a little bit and make it a more intimate, focused piece of work that doesn’t focus on Lincoln’s whole life, but the last couple months of his life where he had to put up with all of these problems, that it’s a real wonder how the guy didn’t just die of a heart-attack right then and there. In a way, a part of me wishes that Spielberg went all-out here and tackle Abe through his life, but seeing him in the latter years of his life does seem like a better fit for Spielberg to play it safe, and not get way too in over his head, like he has been known to get in recent-years. However, that’s not to say that Spielberg still doesn’t have what it takes to deliver some the top-notch directing moments we all know and love him for.

I think what really intrigued me the most about this flick was how it shows just how hard it was, and probably still is, to get a bill passed and all of the twists and turns that come along with that mission. Abe had to talk to a lot of people, had to plan out a lot of ideas in his head, had to win over a crap-load of people, and most of all, had to still keep it in his mind to do the right thing. It’s a very hard, especially in today’s day and age of politics, to not only do the right thing but also keep with that idea in your head and never mess-up on that. Abe never gets dirty with where he gets with his mission to abolish slavery, and it’s really fresh to see considering this is a guy that America still reveres to this day.

We get a great glimpse at a guy, we can only read about in bore-fest books and Spielberg, for the most part, delivers on that spectrum. The story is as simple as they come, yet, Spielberg never loses sight of what he really wants to show and what he really wants to convey and we get that perfectly. It’s a slow-burn of a movie, but Spielberg keeps it surprisingly entertaining with a couple of nice touches here and there where we feel like we are placed in the same exact setting that the movie’s portraying, and also feel like we’re on the edge-of-our-seat, wondering just how the hell this bill is going to get passed. Yeah, yeah, yeah. We all know that the bill gets passed and whatnot, but the film still kept me wishing and hoping that it would, considering there is so much anger and aggression against it, that’s a huge wonder how it didn’t continued to get denied until this very day.

However, I still can’t lie to you and tell you that I loved this movie, because I really didn’t. The problem I had with this movie was that it would go on for so long (it clocks in at 150 minutes, if that tells you anything already) with just talking, arguing, and political-jargon being used, that I actually felt myself dozing off a couple of times and wondering when they were going to get a move on with this story. Playing it subdued and intimate was a nice approach that Spielberg decided to use, but when your whole film is about a bunch of people just talking about a bill that we all know gets passed at the end of it all, well, it can be a bit repetitive, as well as, dare I say it, boring.

Another problem I had with this movie was that I wasn’t as emotionally-invested as I feel so many other people were with this movie. Ever since this movie came out, I’ve been seeing reviews from people that are just talking about how much they couldn’t handle their emotions during this film and just had to let out all of the tears. My question is, how the hell are all of these people crying at a movie that’s about a story we all know, a history-figure we all think we know, and features a screenplay, where everybody talks and hollers at each other in this sophisticated, political language that is rarely ever muttered in today’s day and age (thank god for that, too)? Seriously, I would get it if we all watched Lincoln from the start of his life, to the end of it but something just did not connect with me and have the water-works moving at the end. Instead, I felt like I knew the man more than I ever did before and I think that’s all I needed, really, a history lesson, not a life-changing experience.

However, I don’t blame these people for getting emotional, either, because when you have Daniel Day-Lewis in the lead, it’s hard not to tear-up. As always, Daniel Day is perfect in a lead role that shows him off to be one of the finest actors we have working today but it’s not the type of role you’d expect from the guy. With roles like Bill Cutting and Daniel Plainview being some of his most famous in recent time, it’s a refresher to see him go back to his old-ways and play soft, gentle, and kind fellow that means no harm to anyone around him, but just wants to do what he thinks is right for the country and what feels right in his heart. He’s obviously a nice guy that you can tell has some real charm to him that wins everybody over that he meets, as well as a knack for story-telling that are some of the funniest, if not thought-provoking pieces of tales that I have ever heard. How many times did Honest Abe break out of regular-conversation just to tell a story about a man and his farm? I don’t know and I don’t care. All I do know is that they were lovely stories to hear, mainly because it was Daniel Day who was delivering them in his sweet, gentle voice that doesn’t even seem recognizable in the least bit.

Daniel day lights up the screen every time he pops-up on it and delivers one of the finest performances of the year, and really does have you sympathize and feel something for a man we rarely know about how he was in life. We read about it in books, but it’s all up in the air as to what or who this guy really was in real-life, but I think Daniel Day’s portrayal is the most accurate depiction we can all go along with and agree on. If Daniel day doesn’t get a nomination this year, hell will freeze over, but then again, I think it’s a pretty sure thing that no matter what the movie the guy signs up to do, he’s going to get an Oscar-nomination regardless and you know what? I have no problem with that because this guy is an actor’s actor, and I can’t wait to see what he does next. That was a pretty obvious statement though, because everybody looks forward to what the guy does next, it’s all just a matter of how long will it take this time around.

Even though Daniel Day is perfect in this lead role, he almost gets the spotlight taken away from him from an actor that could also be considered “an actor’s actor”. Tommy Lee Jones plays Thaddeus Stevens in a way that we all know and love Jones for playing his roles. He’s cranky, he’s old, he’s witty, and most of all, he’s a bastard that you do not want to go toe-to-toe with when it comes to an argument. As Stevens, Jones allows this fact to be even more truer than we already know it to be and really gives us a glimpse at a man that may even want this bill passed more than Lincoln himself, and there’s an amazing, final scene with him that shows us why. Jones is on-fire in this role and I really do think that he’s a sure-thing for an Oscar nomination this year and I do not disagree with that one-bit because the guy is always spectacular, he’s just been wasting too much of his time as Agent K to really allow us to see what is so spectacular about him in the first-place.

Playing Lincoln’s wife, Sally Fields probably gives one of her best performances I’ve seen from her in the longest time. Fields plays Mary Todd Lincoln the same exact way you’d expect her to play her, she’s weird, she’s paranoid, she’s always angry, but yet, she’s always supportive of what Abe does and to see that play out in this film is a thing of beauty, considering her and Daniel Day have great husband-wife chemistry between the two. As opposed to Jones and Lewis, I don’t think Fields is a sure-shot for an Oscar nomination this year, but hey, if she does end up getting one I will not be pissed in the least bit. The gal is great with all that she’s given and it’s finally time that somebody’s given her a role to chew down on.

This whole movie is filled with a supporting cast that will probably shock you by how many names it really does have and to be honest, there’s a bit of a problem with that. See, there are so many damn people in this movie that even though they are all so good with each and every one of their own, respective roles, it becomes a bit of a waste to see such good talent in roles that sometimes don’t show-up on-screen for any longer than 5 minutes. Having a huge, supporting cast is great if you want to make sure every character is well-done, and every performance is good but after awhile, it sort of starts to tick you off once you realize that half of these people can do some quality work in their own flicks, they just aren’t given the chance all that much. Still, it’s great to see such big names show up in a production together and show how much people still want to work with Spielberg.

Consensus: Lincoln may take some people by surprise to how it plays-out, but if you can handle a bunch of talking, then it will definitely keep you watching from beginning-to-end with a spectacular lead performance from Daniel Day, and a message about doing the right thing, no matter who gets in the way that is still relevant today, especially in the world of politics.

8/10=Matinee!!

About these ads

25 responses to “Lincoln (2012)

  1. ianthecool November 10, 2012 at 3:30 pm

    The downsides you list for this film seem to confirm my fears that this is just another long, plodding biopic. Yawn. I’m disappointed with Spielberg for the easiest of routes for dramatic movies: the dreaded biopic.

  2. Stephanie November 10, 2012 at 10:47 pm

    This sounds like the kind of movie I’d enjoy — I often pick movies just for the history. And I love Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Fields. Thanks for the balanced, articulate review. I have a feeling I’ll be watching this alone, because my family would be bored out of their wits. *LOL*

  3. Jason Rodriguez November 11, 2012 at 12:10 am

    I’m a PhD in history so I baaaadly want to see this.

  4. Red Toenails November 11, 2012 at 12:10 pm

    I’m so glad this was a good one. I’ve been wanting to see it since I seen the preview. Thanks.

  5. Ryan M. November 12, 2012 at 1:53 pm

    I really enjoyed the movie but agree with most of your points. I think DDL is a god and that it’s a real powerhouse cast of character actors (I get elbowing my wife and saying “Hey it’s that guy!”) but sweet baby ray’s it’s long and to me, that means I didn’t really like it that much. For example, I love Zodiac, which clocks at 3 hours, but I don’t even think about how long it is.

  6. AndyWatchesMovies November 12, 2012 at 9:08 pm

    Great review – I’m really looking forward to seeing this, but I may wait for the blu-ray

  7. flickswithmaddog November 15, 2012 at 4:49 am

    I’m gonna go see Lincoln Friday, I’m totally excited! Daniel Day Lewis is one actor who truly does have a serious talent for the profession. From Last of the Mohicans to There Will Be Blood, he’s the man! Great review! Also I love your set up style. :D

  8. Michael Isenberg November 17, 2012 at 3:26 pm

    Great description of Tommy Lee Jones’s Thaddeus Stevens: “He’s cranky, he’s old, he’s witty, and most of all, he’s a bastard that you do not want to go toe-to-toe with when it comes to an argument.”

    But gotta disagree with you that there was too much talking. The movie held my attention for the whole 2 1/2 hours – and I have a short attention span!

    Mike
    http://www.FullAsylum.com

  9. Mark Hobin November 19, 2012 at 9:56 am

    There really were a lot of actors in this film. People kept popping up and it did get a little, “Oh look there’s…” and “I didn’t know _____ was in this.” I share your frustration with the film. Although it a an admirable effort, it was hard to really enjoy this. Daniel Day Lewis is extraordinary, however, and deserves every accolade he gets.

  10. Fogs' Movie Reviews November 19, 2012 at 8:35 pm

    While I’m with you that I dont understand how people could get too emotional over this film… I mean, it really doesnt connect with you emotionally… I do disagree on it being boring. I was fascinated by the historical politicking.

    And of course, DDL was ridiculously good. Seriously. That just cant even be comprehended, what he did.

  11. Pingback: Lincoln (2012) | The Reel Collection

  12. AngryVader (Erik) November 24, 2012 at 4:38 am

    Nice review, Dan. I didn’t find this as boring as others, and I was able to get invested, but that’s mainly due to the great performances and that I appreciated the different angle on a President we’ve seen countless stories about.

  13. Chris November 25, 2012 at 4:58 am

    Pretty much agree with all but the boring parts. I thought the movie was completely engaging from start to finish, and even more so on a second viewing. If I didn’t go in already knowing the length I would have sworn this was closer to a 90 minute or 2 hour long movie. But in any event, pretty much agree with everything else for the most part. Good review, Dan, and I’ve got my own review coming up soon!

  14. Pingback: Lincoln Review: Pornography for Historians | Rorschach Reviews

  15. Pingback: LAMBscores: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln by the (Not-So) Coward James Bond | The Large Association of Movie Blogs

  16. Erik January 25, 2013 at 7:40 pm

    Finally it arrived to the UK as well. Good review Dan, i agree with you. Excellent production and performances but god it is a drag sometimes…

  17. Ryan Hawbecker April 5, 2013 at 5:20 am

    I didn’t learn a whole lot that I didn’t know and it is a bit too long. Check out my review http://www.ryanhawbecker.com/2012/11/lincoln-movie-review.html?spref=tw

  18. Pingback: » Movie Review – Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Fernby Films

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,147 other followers

%d bloggers like this: