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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Black Hawk Down (2001)


Did the U.S. Army actually screw up for once? And come close to admitting it?!?! What is this?!?

It’s the fall of 1992 in Mogadishu, Somalia, and just about every citizen of that city is starving to death. Why? Well, powerful warlords are using starvation as a fear-tactic to knock down the weak, get the strong ones, and find out who is most loyal to fighting the good fight. This doesn’t seem like such a nice thing in the eyes of Americans, so it’s seems obvious that the next the U.S. army would take would be to go over there themselves and show them the right way to live and be socially acceptable. In order to do this, they need to capture a powerful warlord named Mohamed Farrah Aidid, the same warlord who declared war on the remaining U.N. personnel still left in his territory. Together as one, the U.S. Army Rangers, Delta Force soldiers, and 160th SOAR aviators all gang up to capture him in what is snow-balled as a “30 minute mission”, no more, no less. However, when one soldier (Orlando Bloom) makes the rookie mistake and gets badly injured in the heat of the battle, that’s when all of the forces begin to fall apart, lose formation, balance, and sight of what they’re in this land for anyway. Suddenly, a 30 minute mission becomes a whole day-affair with more than a few casualties, and families with members taken away from them, as a result.

"Exposition, exposition, oh, and before I forget to mention it: Exposition."

“Exposition, exposition, oh, and before I forget to mention it: Exposition.”

So marks the fifth and most likely not going to be my final, viewing of this movie and needless to say, time has not done this one well. That’s less of a hit on this movie, and more of a hit on the type of pretentious movie reviewer I have become, but so be it! The fact of the matter is that even though the film has lost its steam in certain spots over the years, the spots that worked so well for me in the first place, still do work. And that all goes back to Ridley Scott’s direction which is, once again, nothing short of spectacular.

It’s common-knowledge now that Scott doesn’t just take a piece of material because he wants to get a new cover for his Jacuzzi; he takes it because he wants to, and feels so passionate about it that he’ll put his whole heart, mind, body, and soul into it. Sometimes, that can usually backfire on him, which is why he is one of the very few filmmakers working today to have director’s cut editions on almost all of his movies, but for the most part, the guy knows what he is doing behind the camera, and it allows for the viewer to take a peak inside of his mind, see what he sees, and wonder just how the hell he was able to cobble all of these pieces of film together to make one, long, cohesive story.

Maybe that’s why the movie won Best Editing all of those years ago. Just maybe.

But anyway, the landing-point for this tangent is that Scott, no matter how hollow the stories he works on may be, he himself, as a director and visual artist, is not. As soon as the movie begins, you feel as if you’re right there with each and every one of these soldiers just shooting the shit, cracking jokes, trying to prove whose ding-a-ling is bigger than the other’s, and so on and so forth. This starts things off on the right, if not more relaxed, foot, so that when things do start to get all crazy and jumpy, not only do we get hit with a sure rush of energy, but make us feel like all of the nice, happy, and playful vibes have gone elsewhere. This is where the material gets serious, and pretty damn violent as well.

However, the violence in this movie never oversteps its boundaries into “gratuitous” territory. Whenever a soldier dies, Scott clearly cares for this character and puts the spotlight right on them for however long that may be, and it gives you the general idea that yes, soldiers did die in this ill-planned raid, but also, fellow human-beings died as well. It’s sad, no questions about it, and that’s why Scott never takes his attention off the gruesome, gory details of this war/raid and has you feel as if you are right there, ducking every bullet within an inch of your life, just hoping that you have the upper-hand on your enemy, and it’s not the other way around. Sort of like warfare, isn’t it? Except that you aren’t actually participating in a war, you’re just watching it all play out, which is both comforting and tense at the same time.

So for right now, I think we’ve pretty much hammered in the fact that Scott is not to be blamed for any of this movie’s short-comings, because trust me, trust me, trust me: There are plenty to be had here. First of all, while I do respect that Scott shows the same type of respect and gratitude to those soldiers who lost their lives during that fateful raid, you never care for any of them. Or, let me try it like this: You’re never really given much of a reason to care in the first place. Sure, it’s easy to feel sympathetic as it is because they’re humans just like us, and were fighting a war, for us, however, nobody really seemed to be the most separate from the pack. Instead, every soldier, with the exception of a whole bunch of familiar faces, feels like the same person and they’re thinly-written persons at that.

Yeeeeeeeeeeeeah. Sorry, bud. Not buying it.

Yeeeeeeeeeeeeah. Sorry, bud. Not buying it.

Take for instance, our lead guy in the midst of this whole battle, Josh Hartnett as SSG Matt Eversmann. Now, obviously Hartnett has never really been the type of actor to carry a film on his shoulders, which makes it strange and relatively reasonable why Scott would make him the main leader in an ensemble feature, but the kid’s never given a chance here with the lame character he has to work with. Not only does Eversmann start off with the most dull and plain motivations any character, in any war movie has ever had, but his whole arch never changes over time. He just sees the war for all of its gory, bloody despair and detail. Once again, another thoughtful pretty-boy who looks at the world as one big bargaining chip where discussion and finding a middle-ground is daily accepted among society, finds out that the world actually isn’t like that? Really?!?! Is that the type of writing we want to accompany a movie about a raid that the U.S. wrongfully envisioned and got caught with their wankers in their hands more than a few times? I don’t think so, but hey, I guess if you have Ridley Scott on-board as director, not much can really go wrong. That’s if you don’t listen to the characters when they speak, which is exactly the problem here with everybody.

Hell, even the most talented actors among this ensemble can’t even save some of these lines from coming off as terribly corny. Tom Sizemore comes close as the bad ass, tough-as-nails commander that, get this, casually walks to wherever he goes on the battlefield. This whole character gets by on Sizemore’s nasty charm, but it’s so ridiculous, that it almost makes you forget about the rest of the stars in this cast that get stuck with even worse characterizations. Jason Isaacs has a really, REALLY thick Southern drawl that never catches on; Eric Bana’s accent is even worse and makes him seem more like a surfer brah, than an actual self-righteous soldier; Jeremy Piven and Ron Eldard love to crack jokes to one another while they’re getting ready to drop off fellow soldiers into a play land full of guns, bullets, explosions, death, and all sorts of viciousness; Sam Shepard yells out orders from a comfy, cozy bunker somewhere very far, far away from where this is happening, and seems like the type of dick nobody wants to be around, on-or-off the battlefield; and Ewan McGregor’s desk-jockey character, as charming as he may be, has that one skill of being able to make a great cup of coffee. Dude would have been hella popular with Buddy the Elf, but in the middle of Mogadishu, where all sorts of guns are being discharged and explosions are, ahem, doing exactly that, does that really matter? Does that even need to be included in here? Actually, those are all rhetorical. The answer is no!!!

Consensus: Scott’s inspired, jumpy, frenetic, and chaotic direction makes Black Hawk Down a thrilling, exciting, and sometimes, scary war flick, but the script never goes any deeper with its message, motivations behind the actual proceedings, or even the real-life soldiers who were involved with it, most of whom deserve better attention and writing. Except for the coffee guy. Seriously, why was he around again?!?!?!

7 / 10 = Rental!!

Must have been gnarly waves........dude.

Must have been gnarly waves……..dude.

Photo’s Credit to: IMDB

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25 responses to “Black Hawk Down (2001)

  1. Tom October 23, 2013 at 6:24 am

    Good review, I don’t know how I’ve managed to get by so long without seeing this.

  2. Zoë October 23, 2013 at 6:46 am

    I enjoyed this movie, and your post just reminded me I need to check it out again. Thank you for adding ANOTHER film to my ever-growing watch list! :P Good job with the write up!

  3. lukebbtt October 23, 2013 at 8:00 am

    I never really got the hype about this movie. Enjoyable, but its essentially one long fight scene that you get bored of before long.

  4. Whit's Movie Reviews October 23, 2013 at 11:34 am

    I really hated this movie. The war scenes were so overused that it got boring after a while. The only good part was that Spud from Trainspotting was in it. Nice review!

  5. theipc October 23, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    Good review, sir.

    My father in law’s coworker claims he was part of the crew that went down in real life, but I’m not sure I believe him.

  6. ruth October 23, 2013 at 5:59 pm

    I really want to see this because of the cast, but the gruesome violence worries me a bit. I might muster up the courage to see it one day though, but generally I can’t handle gritty war films.

  7. rgagne October 23, 2013 at 8:14 pm

    Very good review. I see your point about the storyline in regards to the characters, but this is still one of the best war related movies ever. You actually feel like your right there over their shoulders as they fight for their life. If you enjoy reading, I would recommend reading “In the Company of Heros” by Michael Durant. He is was one of the pilots who gets captured and his books goes into great detail about everything he suffered through in 11 days. He is from my hometown, so I got to meet him and have an autograph copy of the book. Probably explains my basis towards the movie ha ha.

    • CMrok93 October 25, 2013 at 2:43 pm

      Wow, that’s pretty cool for you. It does do a credible job of making you feel like you’re there, but it doesn’t quite make you feel like you’re there with actual human-beings. Just stock characters.

  8. Three Rows Back October 23, 2013 at 8:38 pm

    Nice work. Great film, shame it has the depth of a puddle.

  9. Chris October 24, 2013 at 3:28 am

    Nice review, Dan. I only just got around to this one maybe a year or so ago, and I recall just thinking it was okay. Certainly not a bad flick, but not nearly as good as I had heard.

  10. Jaina October 24, 2013 at 12:48 pm

    This film has so many recognisable faces. Now. Everyone from Tom Hardy to Nikolaj Coster-Waldau! It’s one of the fun reasons to watch it now. But that’s where the fun ends.

    You mention how all the characters/actors are a bit.. predictable. Thing is, with this film, it’s not about the actors or even the characters to some extent. It’s about the event unfolding.

    One of my favourite Ridley Scott films and probably my favourite modern warfare film. Always hits hard!

  11. Mike Pierce (@mikethemovieguy) October 24, 2013 at 3:15 pm

    One of the best war movie’s. Everyone should have this in their DVD collection.Mike – iWatchMike.com

  12. angie chui November 1, 2013 at 1:58 am

    This is one of my favorite war movies. Must’ve seen it 4 times. Great post

  13. Skye Vitiritti March 22, 2014 at 11:18 pm

    I’m late to the comment party, but that’s okay.

    I watched this film when it came out in theaters. I was in the Air Force preparing to head over to Afghanistan. I’ve seen it dozens of times since the initial theater viewing, but two scenes stay with me to this day.

    First, I love the scene where Grimes says, “I have a rare and mysterious skill that keeps me from going on the missions” I used to use this as my email signature during my entire enlistment after viewing the film. I was facility maintenance and management, which is just a fancy term for a structural engineer.

    Second, the scene where the Somili’s parade around with the dead bodies of the pilots. That still makes me cry. I think a lot of it today has to do with the things I saw during my time in Iraq and Afghanistan in the early 00s.

    It’s still one of the best films dealing with human emotion and war that I have ever seen. Just because a film deals with the military doesn’t mean the military has to be either an inept band of war-happy bunglers (think of the military in “Godzilla”), nor does it mean the military has to be the wartime reincarnation of Jesus. Showing the true chaos that is war and combat, particular in urban settings, helps to show the audience how difficult it was for those on the ground in Mogadishu.

    Great review of an outstanding film.

  14. Pingback: » Movie Review – Miss Potter Fernby Films

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