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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

The Aviator (2004)


Good thing those milk bottles didn’t go to waste.

This is the story of aviation pioneer Howard Hughes (Leonardo DiCaprio), the type of man that Hollywood adored, yet, had no clue what to do with. Then again though, he didn’t know what to do with himself half of the time, so it evens-out. Anyway, we follow Hughes’ life from when he sets out to make his first movie, Hell’s Angels, to where he spends ungodly amounts of money, and pisses off all sorts of people like his lawyers, his distributors, his agents, his lawyers, and even the major corporations that are trying to do business with him, however, he chooses to say “nay” to. Hughes has a vision that only he thinks he can achieve, not just solely through money or power (although that certainly does help), but through his determined heart and soul, that sometimes falls victim to his many bouts and problems with OCD, of which he gained at an early age through his mommy. But even through all of these problems though, Hughes still had a little bit of time to get down and dirty with the ladies, especially and most famously with none other than Ms. Katharine Hepburn (Cate Blanchett) herself.

Present-day Hollywood’s fascination with Howard Hughes seems like it may never end, and it makes sense as to why. Not only was Howard Hughes the type of creative genius that didn’t settle for something else that went against his original, near-perfect vision, but was also able to charm anybody over that he met, get rich, solving any problem that may have come into his way by throwing money at it and at the end of the day, still having enough time in his hectic schedule to go home to some of Hollywood’s spiciest, sexiest starlets of the day. Yep, that Howard Hughes surely was a man among men, and it makes perfect sense why fellow creative geniuses’ like Christopher Nolan, Warren Beatty, and yes, even Martin Scorsese would want to make a movie about him, his life, his struggles, his genius and what he gave the rest of the world.

Apparently Hughes also shacked-up with that chick from No Doubt, before they got big. Or hell, before they were even born.

Apparently Hughes also shacked-up with that chick from No Doubt, before they got big. Or hell, before they were even born.

Of course though, only one of those three was able to actually achieve their dream and get their project on him made. That person was Martin Scorsese, and what a great choice it was (although the other two wouldn’t have been so bad neither).

What Scorsese does expertly here, that he’s practically done with each and every one of his flicks, is that he’s able to take a long-winding, over-blown story, with an even longer run-time, and finds a way to have it go by in a total jiffy. There’s no room for error, or even breathing with Scorsese’s directing, no matter what it is that he’s doing and this movie is no different. He covers every aspect of Hughes’ life with just enough attention, detail and honest reality that we get a full, clear picture of what he’s trying to tell us, without ever being confused, despite the movie usually finding itself moving a mile-a-minute at times. However though, when you do have a movie that nears three-hours, you need to be quick, jumpy and to-the-point, but never so much, to the point of where you lose a viewer as to what the hell is exactly going on, to whom, at what time and why this all matters.

And with a movie about Howard Hughes’ life, that makes a lick of a difference since there seems to be so much that went on with this guy’s day-to-day life, it’s a surprise that Scorsese himself didn’t make it a four-hour-epic, 15-minute intermission included (then again though, I wouldn’t throw that out as if it wasn’t already a “possibility” inside the head of Scorsese’s). For instance, we stumble upon Hughes’ life right away and we get an idea of what he is doing and why: He’s making his Hell’s Angels epic, he’s trying to figure out a way on how to get it looking and sounding perfectly, he’s trying to create some of the biggest, and best airplanes the world has ever seen, and through it all, mostly, he’s trying to find that one sweet, everlasting soul that can fill up the damage and pain that’s been brewing deep down inside of him for a long, long time. In a way then, you could almost say that this is three different movies, taking place with the same subject: A movie about showbiz, a character-study, a romance flick, and an underdog-tale.

But see, the problem is that Scorsese doesn’t really nail all of these aspects that make this whole movie one, cohesive piece of nonfiction. The stuff about showbiz is interesting because it was very cool to see how Hughes, the creative visionary that he was, didn’t let high-heads in major corporations get in the way of achieving what he wanted for his movies, as well as how he just continued to throw his money away on certain smaller things that had to do with production like editing, sound mixing, color and, heck, even making sure that there were clouds in the sky when he was filming the airplane sequences for his movie (which, need I remind you, he did all himself). And even for the romance part of this story, Scorsese still nails most of it, although I’d wager that’s more because of the gals he gets to star as Hughes’ various lovers are usually better than the material given to them, but more on that later.

As for the other two parts of this story (the character-study and underdog-tale), I don’t know if Scorsese really hits, or hits well for that matter. We do sympathize with Hughes when we see him battling with his OCD, his paranoia and how it makes him totally lose his shit in public, in front of the people that matter the most no less. It’s sad to see this happen to this guy, since we know that when he has a clear-head on his shoulders, he’s the smartest, most charming guy in the room, and it does make you sympathize with him a bit. However, late in the movie, once we get an idea of who the baddies are in this story that want to go against Hughes, his vision and tarnish his name in the papers, it d starts to feel like we get more away from the inner-demons that Hughes himself battled on a daily-basis, and more towards how he fought against the big-wigs in corporations and came out looking like a superhero. That’s all fine and all, especially since it’s all true, but it doesn’t really do much to make us feel like we know this guy, nor do we feel like much is actually at-stake. It is more or less that we’re just watching a guy battle against a bunch of people that could bad mouth him even worse than what’s already been said about him, or that he could add more and more millions of dollars into his bank-account.

Either way, it seems like Howard Hughes, despite his inability to twist doorknobs, will probably be better off in his life, regardless of how this settlement ends.

That said, Hughes is somebody, even through the thickest and the thin, we stand behind, which is all thanks to Leonardo DiCaprio’s amazing performance, giving everybody our first glimpse at the type of stardom he was about to fully achieve. Nowadays, it seems like Leo’s on fire with each and every role he takes, but around the time of this movie, he was basically just another case of a “promising, pretty-boy face that may actually have acting-skills”. Sure, Catch Me If You Can showed us that there was more to him than just being the king of the world, but this was the movie where he really got his time to shine and showed everybody that he could make somebody like Howard Hughes seem like a real poor fellow, despite having all of the money, fame and skill in the world, that one human could possibly desire. But like I said, even while he may not be the nicest man in the world, he still is one we care for and get behind, even when the odds seem more than stacked-up against him.

"Whose balls were bigger?" was usually where most conversations tended to lean towards.

“Whose balls were bigger” was usually where most of their conversations tended to lean towards.

Cate Blanchett shows up to play Katharine Hepburn, one of Hughes’ most notable flings back in the golden days and does a pretty spot-on impersonation, but also shows us that there’s more underneath the whole facade of her being like “one of the boys”. She can be preppy, she can be spirited and she can sure as hell kick some other dude’s behind in a game of golf, but there’s a reason why she is the way she is, why it is that she falls so hard for Howard when she does, and why it is that she falls out of love with him, only to take up her time with the gruff, teddy-bear we all know as Spencer Tracy. We all know Blanchett’s an amazing actress and can seemingly do no wrong, but to show us that she could get us past the fact that she’s playing one of the world’s most famous, iconic actresses of all-time, was really something else. And hell, she won an Oscar for it, too, so good for her!

However, Blanchett and DiCaprio are just the two here out of this whole cast that seem to get plenty of screen-time and attention from Scorsese, but they aren’t the only good ones here. John C. Reilly is good as Noah Dietrich, the Chief Executive Officer of Hughes’ estate and is just kind and mellowed-out enough to make us believe that he does actually give two hoots about Hughes, but also cares more about his wallet than anything else; Kate Beckinsale plays another famous dame that Hughes hooked-up with, in the form of Ava Gardner, and is fine, although it’s fairly obvious that she’s nothing more than pair of nice teeth, eyes and, well, you get it; and Alan Alda and Adam Baldwin both play two of the main heavies in this movie that try to their legalities around and at Hughes, and do fine showing us that they want money, they love money and they need it, especially if its Hughes’ money it is that they’re taking. Don’t know how Alda got nominated for an Oscar for this, considering that he mostly just yells at and argues with DiCaprio, but hey, I guess it was about time that he got “some” recognition, you know? Oh, and Willem Dafoe is in this for one scene, and then he’s mysteriously absent from the rest of the movie. However, as weird as it is, I guess one scene with Willem Dafoe, is better than no scene with Willem Dafoe, am I right?

Consensus: Scorsese clearly has an undying love and adoration for Howard Hughes, the man he was, the man he set-out to be, and all of the achievements of his grand-staking life, but while the Aviator shows that, it can’t help but feel a bit jumbled in the process, especially since Hughes’ life as it was, seemed to be so hectic at one point in time.

8 / 10 = Matinee!!

Locked in, lonely, naked, bearded and pissing into jars is usually how most people in Hollywood end-up, so don't sweat it, Howie!

Locked-away, lonely, naked, bearded and pissing into jars is usually how most people in Hollywood end-up, so don’t sweat it, Howie!

Photo’s Credit to: IMDBColliderComingSoon.net

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36 responses to “The Aviator (2004)

  1. sidekickreviews December 23, 2013 at 7:36 am

    Blanchette is amazing in Aviator. Scorsese and Dicaprio make a great collaboration, can’t wait for Wolf on Wall Street. Nice review.

  2. thomasjford December 23, 2013 at 9:19 am

    Great film, I totally agree. One of Scorsese’s over looked gems I think.

  3. Three Rows Back December 23, 2013 at 9:55 am

    Any film with Alan Alda should be cherished. As a ‘prestige’ film I thought this really had wings (forgive the pun) :)

  4. Terry Malloy's Pigeon Coop December 23, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    Definitely underrated this one. I watched this when it first came out but haven’t seen it since. Feel like I’d appreciate it more now.

  5. mikeyb @ screenkicker December 23, 2013 at 1:17 pm

    DiCaprio really should have won an Oscar for this. I was totally blown away by his performance. And I think it’s Scorsese’s best film in the last ten years. Fantastic review!

  6. Zoë December 23, 2013 at 1:19 pm

    Great review! I really enjoyed this one, but then I am a huge DiCaprio fan, and I LOVE it when he and Scorsese work together – you are guaranteed to get something excellent.

  7. ckckred December 23, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    Nice review and I agree. It’s good but not great and isn’t in the same league as Scorsese’s best.

  8. Consumed by Film December 23, 2013 at 3:35 pm

    Been a while since i’ve watched The Aviator, but your review certainly seems to ring true. A self-admitted big fan of DiCaprio (aren’t we all really?) i reckon he should’ve won an Oscar for this – although Jamie Foxx is utterly electric as Ray Charles and certainly merited his win. It’ll be tough to topple Redford, Ejiofor etc come 2014’s event, but if anyone can, surely it’s ScorCaprio with Wall Street. Great review!

  9. theipc December 23, 2013 at 3:56 pm

    I think this movie is the tits. Good work!

  10. Whit's Movie Reviews December 23, 2013 at 4:39 pm

    I really liked this movie and I think it’s one of DiCaprio’s best. Maybe less so for Scorsese. Still really liked it though, especially those really well shot crash sequences. Good review Dan.

  11. Popcorn Nights December 23, 2013 at 4:47 pm

    Awesome film, and I also think DiCaprio could have been a deserving Oscar winner for this, although all five nominees that year were superb.

  12. ruth December 23, 2013 at 11:10 pm

    Leo certainly had a penchant for playing unhinged characters. I think he went ever further in Wolf of Wall Street. I LOVED the look of this film, taking us back to the classic era. Cate Blanchett is the scene stealer, as she did more than simply impersonating Hepburn.

    • CMrok93 December 26, 2013 at 1:29 am

      She got us more to the inside of who Hepburn was as a person, rather than the person you always saw in the spotlight. Although, she definitely did play that aspect of her character up as well.

  13. Courtney Small December 24, 2013 at 12:32 am

    This film and Gangs of New York rank amongst my least favorite Scorese films. I felt he only truly hit his stride with Leo around The Departed/Shutter Island years.

    • CMrok93 December 26, 2013 at 1:31 am

      Yeah, they definitely seemed to start working better come that time. However, this one isn’t so shabby neither. It just pales in comparison to the other pairings they had.

  14. cindybruchman December 24, 2013 at 1:26 am

    Ohh, I love this film. I thought everyone was brilliant. Cate really nailed Hepburn and deserved the Oscar, and I thought so did Leo. His time will come!

  15. dbmoviesblog December 24, 2013 at 2:36 am

    Great review, and what an amazing film. You know the emotions and feelings are taken care of in a film when you get DiCaprio there, and although Blanchett is always mesmerising to watch, she really blew me away with her acting in this one. Though I have not watched ‘Blue Jasmine’ yet, I am dying to.

  16. Niejan December 24, 2013 at 11:23 am

    Over the years I’ve really enjoyed the Scorsese&DiCaprio films and this film is a great example of an outstanding duo. Nice review Dan.

  17. Pingback: The Wolf of Wall Street | digitalshortbread

  18. literaryvittles January 1, 2014 at 1:13 am

    probably my favorite Scorsese movie! But it’s Alec Baldwin, not Adam.

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