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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Good Night, And Good Luck (2005)


Television, where have you gone?

During the mid-1950s, there was a man by the name of Senator Joseph McCarthy who saw many people around him as “communists”. Those people he found to be affiliated with this political party, regardless as to whether or not he had substantial evidence, would be put on trial, questioned, manipulated and practically have their lives ruined, all without much grounds to stand on. Not many people liked to see this happen, however, not many people voiced their disapproval in hopes of not being considered a “communist” as well. There was one man, though, that saw wrong-doings being committed and he was a pretty well-known figure at the time, that definitely had enough power and respect within his own industry to where he could get in front of the television, speak out his mind and say what he has to say loud, proud, and in front of thousands, upon thousands all over the nation. That man, was Edward R. Murrow (David Strathairn), and he was more than willing to take on McCarthy and all of his fellow “red-baiters”; but, as most of us know when you’re taking on the bull, you’re going to eventually get the horns.

You have to hand it to George Clooney – when he isn’t being charming, swift, lovable and the coolest mofo on the face of this planet, he’s always finding a way to express himself in a way that makes us see him as more than just a pretty face, with a pair of fresh, shiny teeth. Sure, he’s got the looks to make it as an actor, and he’s definitely got the skills to make it as both an director and a writer, but believe it or not, the guy’s also got a pretty big head on his shoulders, with some very bright, very insightful ideas that he’s not afraid to let public to the rest of the world. In today’s day and age, where celebrities are getting all sorts of clatter for speaking out with whatever controversial opinion they may, or may not have, you have to give someone as famous, as well-known and as respected as George Clooney is to, most of the time, let everyone know what he thinks about where society is headed, and why he thinks it’s either in a good, or bad direction.

So much lung cancer.

So much lung cancer in that right room.

However, in this case, George comes down to the conclusion that we’re all going in the later-direction; don’t worry though, because there is a light at the end of the tunnel, as faint as it may be.

I guess what I am trying to get across here is that, as both co-writer and director, George Clooney definitely has a lot to handle in terms of giving us a real-life story, that mostly everybody knows about and, if we’re being brutally honest, may not be all that interesting to put to screen in a big, showwy way, with a whole bunch of familiar, attractive faces attached to the roles. But that problem soon goes away once we realize that not only does Clooney get past the problems of making a story as well-known like this, still interesting, but he also finds way to keep us entertained, while also informed on the side as well. For every point being made about how you should speak up for yourself, regardless of what others out there may be saying; there’s always a cool glance or two about how television during the 50’s was done, how a story was put-together, who it went through first and just why the ratings were so freakin’ crucial during that time. So for anybody who doesn’t give a lick about what Murrow may be saying about McCarthy and his “unjust allegations”, then have no fear, because there’s still plenty of people smoking, beautiful black-and-white cinematography to gaze, and plenty of lovely faces that all adapt quite well to the 50’s setting.

And the people that Clooney was able to get for this movie, including himself, all do amazing jobs with what they’re given, even though it’s fairly clear that their characters come second to whatever message Clooney wants to get across. There’s nothing all that wrong with that since that message is exactly why Clooney is making this film, but in the case of Murrow, you get the idea that we never get to know who this person really was, behind the camera and dead-pan tone; we just know that he’s a patriot and sticks to everything he says, no matter how many times people spit in his face about it (figuratively, not literally). Maybe that wasn’t Clooney’s point, but it does create a bit of a distance between us and Murrow, especially once we realize that it’s his story that really matters most, even despite all of the Left-Wing propaganda Clooney is shoveling down our throats (in a good way, I promise).

But it’s easy to get past this problem with Murrow, as well as every other character here, solely due to the fact that the people in these respective roles are great and can do efficient work, when given the shot to. David Strathairn really excels here at giving us more than just a simple impersonation of the man we all know, and delivers each and every single speech with passion in his heart, and a fire in his eyes, without ever showing too much emotion or feeling in the process; except only to smoke and inhale, that is. It’s surprising to see someone as notable as George Clooney take on the type of role that would have been perfect for a “character actor”, but he works pretty damn fine as Fred Friendly, giving us a restrained, off-to-the-side performance we don’t usually see from him. Then again though, this is his movie, so maybe he didn’t want to be hogging-up the spotlight a bit too much now, eh?

Everybody else is great too, and shows you that Clooney himself probably picked each of these people so damn delicately, right down to the very bone of the role. Frank Langella has a few, wonderful scenes as the chief executive of CBS, William Paley, the man who practically runs the whole show, but never censors Murrow one bit, giving him a clear-conscience in the name of journalism; Patricia Clarkson and Robert Downey Jr. show up and add some much-needed heart and humor to the proceedings as a married-couple trying not to get caught actually being married, due to it being against CBS policy; Jeff Daniels is clearly having a ball in his few scenes as Frank Stanton, another one of Murrow’s bosses who doesn’t like everything that goes down, but is still there to stand by and watch the fire-works occur; and lastly, Ray Wise does a pretty efficient job as Don Hollenbeck, CBS’s evening-news reporter who you just feel so bad for once you see him, and never lose a single ounce of sympathy for, all because you can tell this is clearly too much for him.

Basically, from the look, to the acting, to the setting; there’s clearly a little something for everyone here, and I think that’s where Clooney really excels at the most.

He gives us a story that is as thought-provoking now, as it might have been nearly 50 years ago, but not without giving those some moments where they can at least be interested in seeing why all of this matters, and how we, as a society, are being affected by all of this today. Because, once you think about it, Murrow isn’t just standing-up for his own right to free speech, but for all of ours as well. He does this in hopes that it will not only translate to news being spread more rapidly, but that we, as viewers, consumers and citizens, will grow smarter and more aware as to what is really out there, and what the truth is lying behind most controversies we see out there.

Aka, a total dick.

Aka, a total dick.

What all of this really comes down to is whether or not we’ve learned from our past mistakes, and if we’ve moved on to informing those in the best, clearest ways possible. Have we? I don’t know. The state of television surely isn’t a pretty one today, with the likes of Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, or 16 & Pregnant, or even an easy target like Jerry Springer, not only taking up most of our television-screens, but our day as well as our head-space, and sadly to say, it seems like it will never end. Are these shows entertaining? Sure, why not! However, can they, or better yet, are they only made to as Murrow himself would say, “distract, delude, amuse and insulate” us? I definitely think so! Now, would Murrow, had he been alive today, be at all pleased with that?

Honestly, I do not think so, but Clooney isn’t trying to beat that horse over the head with a hammer that’s nearly about to break; instead, he’s just trying to show us that television, like all news formats, can still be important, interesting and worth watching. Though the art of journalism itself has definitely lost some credibility over the years, and in ways, changed its own meaning, it’s still out there for us to read, see or hear about, and rather than just sitting on our pie-holes and listening to what other’s are telling us what to think, we should be out there, right now, allowing ourselves to speak freely and make up our own mind about whatever feels right for us. Who cares what those over-paid, sponsored-up hacks from ABC have to say, go with what you think and never let your own opinion, no matter how unpopular or popular it may in fact be, get shut-down. Stick to your guns, speak your mind and never let go of your stance. If you can do this and keep to it, then you’re only influencing others to do the same, and therefore, continuing on the cycle of people thinking, speaking for, and overall, just being themselves.

Now that is something I feel as if Murrow would be quite pleased with.

Consensus: Smart, well-crafted and powerful in the message it’s trying to get across about the future state of television and information, Good Night, And Good Luck is basically a history-lesson with many attractive, talented people giving it to us, but it’s never a boring one, or one that rings false. Just sticks straight to the facts, much like Edward R. Murrow himself.

8.5 / 10 = Matinee!!

If this guy doesn't make you want to start smoking and speaking about politics, I don't know who will. Surely not Glenn Beck!

If this guy doesn’t make you want to start smoking and speaking about politics, I don’t know who will. Surely not that joke Glenn Beck!

Photo’s Credit to: IMDBColliderJobloComingSoon.net

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34 responses to “Good Night, And Good Luck (2005)

  1. jjames36 February 5, 2014 at 5:18 am

    Good review. And again I agree. This movie is very, very good.

  2. keith7198 February 5, 2014 at 6:31 am

    Fine review. I don’t remember the exact score I gave it in my review but I do remember liking it. Some really good performances.

  3. Zoë February 5, 2014 at 7:15 am

    Great review Dan. Looks truly intriguing, I must admit…

    I blame YOU primarily for my ever-growing watch list!

  4. thomasjford February 5, 2014 at 9:23 am

    Good movie. Clooney certainly got lucky in the looks AND talent stakes didn’t he! Good actor AND good director. Geez…

  5. johnlink00 February 5, 2014 at 11:12 am

    Great work here Dan. Just rewatched this myself. Such a good movie!

  6. cindybruchman February 5, 2014 at 1:23 pm

    Awesome review and I couldn’t agree with your analysis more. :)

  7. Mark Walker February 5, 2014 at 1:29 pm

    Nice one Dan. I thought this was fantastic and by far the best of Clooney’s directorial outings. I was actually quite surprised how solid and informative it was.

  8. Jackie February 5, 2014 at 3:31 pm

    I remember hearing a lot about this movie when it was up for all those Oscars years ago. Don’t remember how many it actually won, but I did remember it was in black & white (something that’s becoming a little less rare in the last couple years).
    Don’t know what it is about Clooney, but when he puts a movie together, whether he’s acting or producing or whatever, he brings a great sense of professionalism to it. They approached this subject in a way where it wasn’t overly boring or as in-your-face as I find politics today. Speaking as someone who lives in a house full of conservatives that breathe “liberals” as if that’s a dirty word. Probably the coolest part WAS that it was in black and white, so the news footage worked into the film seamlessly.

    • CMrok93 February 6, 2014 at 5:48 pm

      It all worked so well that it didn’t matter what stance you may, or may not have taken on the subject. Clooney made it interesting and somewhat entertaining for all who wanted to see this, and that’s the best thing he could have ever done for this material. A true professional, that George Clooney is.

  9. Wendell February 5, 2014 at 3:59 pm

    Agreed, this is an excellent film. David Strathairn absolutely kills it.

  10. Dan Heaton February 5, 2014 at 3:59 pm

    I love this film. All the acting is so good, and Clooney creates such a relaxed atmosphere at the news room among the staff. This was one of my favorite movies of 2005, and my appreciation just keeps growing. The black-and-white cinematography works perfectly, and it gives David Strathairn a rare chance to shine.

  11. Whit's Movie Reviews February 5, 2014 at 4:48 pm

    Sounds great, except for maybe all the ‘historical smoking’! Pretty big fan of most of Clooney’s directorial stuff (except for Leatherheads) so this looks worth a shot. Nice write-up dude,

  12. JustMeMike February 5, 2014 at 4:54 pm

    I believe that when this film was a theatrical release (in 2005) , I passed on seeing it. Likely because it was b&w, and was a story about Sen. McCarthy, Edward R.Murrow, the HUAC, and such. Murrow had died in 1965, and in 2005 I wasn’t doing film reviews.

    But I did get to see it via Netflix, a few years ago. Great film.

    Thanks for this fine review.

    .

  13. Consumed by Film February 5, 2014 at 5:56 pm

    Watched this recently too and loved it. The aesthetic is smokey and brilliant, but the film is so much more than simply a visual appeasement. Great review Dan!

  14. thycriticman February 5, 2014 at 6:30 pm

    That is a kick-ass cast, and I’ve heard the hype about it, just never really had any interest. Not the biggest fan of Clooney in all honestly! Your review is making me feel like I should give it a shot though, so that is a possibility.

  15. Three Rows Back February 6, 2014 at 8:04 pm

    Clooney’s best film. Tip top review Dan.

  16. Victor De Leon February 10, 2014 at 5:53 pm

    Amazing review, Dan. One of your best. Insightful and a very good read, man. I love this film and I hold it in high regard. It’s visually and thematically brilliant. So full of that noir goodness. I am always afraid to review it because I feel I may not do it justice. But you did! Great job. I need to re-visit the movie asap. Thanks!

  17. Ms. Coolsville February 13, 2014 at 2:02 am

    It’s been awhile since I viewed this one, but I have to say David Strathairn is one of the best actors around. The entire cast looked so classy in black and white! And while Clooney and I appear to be on slightly different levels of the political spectrum, I felt that Good Night and Good Luck lies on a middle ground for all to enjoy. The movie is an effective history lesson.

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