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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)


Best way to coax your family into loving you again? Fake your death. It’s working for Andy.

The Tenenbaums aren’t your ordinary family, but then again, they don’t pretend to be either. The hierarchy of this family is Royal Tenenbaum (Gene Hackman) who isn’t necessarily the nicest, most up-front, or responsible guy in the world; in fact, he’s kind of an ass. This is why (or from what we know of) he gets kicked out his own house by his wife Etheline (Anjelica Huston), leaving behind his three children – the adopted oldest Margot (Gwyneth Paltrow); the over-achieving; ambitious middle-son Chas Tenenbaum (Ben Stiller); and the relative-favorite of Royal’s, Richie Tenenbaum (Luke Wilson). For years, Royal doesn’t speak to them or see them at all, which leaves them to grow-up full of angst, disappointment and all sorts of mistakes that make them resent him a whole lot more. However, Royal wants to change all of that as soon as he can once he realizes that he might just be dying of cancer, and is given six weeks to live. Though his kids and even his wife, have all moved on with their lives, they somehow find their way back into the house they all once lived in, which is where all of the various ego’s and heads start to clash.

He may be too old for some shit, but slaying white women isn't one of them.

He may be too old for some shit, but slaying white women isn’t one of them.

It’s pretty known among fans of him, that if you’re able to get past all of Wes Anderson’s various quirks and just accept his style for what it is, then you can actually find there’s a lot more rewarding-features to what he does. Not just with a story, or in the way he puts so much effort into the look, but to the actual characters he has in the story, as miserable and as unlikable as they sometimes can be. But I like to think of the characters he creates, as not just being considered “unlikable” or even “loathsome”, but maybe just “human”, with all of the nasty, dirty features added-on that we don’t always want to see or be reminded of actually being capable of having. Maybe it works for me and has me go to bed easier at night, but that’s always my advice to anybody who wants to watch one of his movies, especially the Royal Tenenbaums – aka, my long-time favorite of his.

I could start this review off pretty obvious and just start diving into Anderson’s sense-of-style, but I think I’ve done that more times than I ought to. Instead, I’m just going to dive right into what makes this movie kick, push and feel: The characters. Wes Anderson, although he doesn’t always look too fondly at the world, or those around him, definitely appreciates the people he places into the world of his own. It’s small, contained, quirky, heartbreaking, funny and full of all sorts of spontaneity that even the most hyper-active person may not be able to handle. That’s why the characters he creates and invites to be apart of this world of his own creation, aren’t just ones we have to pay attention to, but are filled to the inner-core with all sorts of small, tiny moments where we see them for all that they are, and who it is that they show the others around them as being.

The perfect example of this would definitely have to be Royal Tenenbaum himself, played with perfection by Gene Hackman. We’ve all seen Hackman play an asshole in a movie before, but here, as Royal, he really gets the chance to stretch that image of his own making and give us a glimpse inside the life of a man who realizes that he’s just too lonely to carry-on in this life without anybody around him any longer. Well, that, and the fact that he’s gotten kicked out of his apartment, may have him thinking of his family as well, but the fact remains that he now knows what it is that he wants with his life, and that’s just to remind those around him that he not only loves them, but wants to actually be with them for once in his life. He may not always say, or do the right things; hell, more often than not, his actions are quite reprehensible to say the least. But once we see Royal for the man he wants to be and clearly wasn’t for the most part of his life, you can’t help but want him to be happy and be loved by those around him, even if they can’t quite bring themselves to having that feeling for him. Instead, they’re more content with just being “fine” towards him; but so is he, so no problems whatsoever.

But what makes Royal such a lovable guy, is that Anderson knows he isn’t perfect and definitely deserves to have life slap him in the face a couple of times, but also doesn’t forget to let him have those small moments of victory where everything in his life that’s possible, seems to be working out for him. Same goes for everybody else in this movie though, as you can tell that Anderson and co-writer Owen Wilson, really did put all of their efforts into making each and every character somebody worth remembering, or caring about, especially once emotions, as well as tears, are shed.

Even the character of Etheline, who could have easily been an angry, vengeful ex-wife, ends up being a woman that not only loves her family, but also wants to be able to move past all of the problems they’ve faced in the past (which in this case, there are plenty of ‘em). Also, the same could be said for Henry Sherman, the guy who wants to marry Etheline, who does show various bouts of jealousy on more than a few occasions, but also doesn’t want to lose the lady he loves, especially not to a swindler like Royal. But, like I said, he’s still a guy that’s backed-up by plenty of human-emotion, that never ceases to show itself in some hilarious, yet brutally honest ways.

I guess in this case, we can all make an exception for incest.

I guess in this case, we can all make an exception for incest.

And that’s mainly where Anderson’s writing really comes to perfection. Not only is the guy hilarious with many of the deadpan, over-the-top one-liners he has his characters deliver, but he makes them seem so damn serious and down-trodden, that you can’t help but laugh at them. They are all human beings, yes, but ones that may take themselves a bit too seriously, despite being absolutely surrounded by all sorts of light, vibrant and pretty colors. That’s why a character like Eli Cash, played wonderfully and ever-so charmingly by the aforementioned Owen Wilson, sticks out amongst a group of sad-faces like Margot, Richie and Chas. Doesn’t make them any less likable or anything, because Anderson appreciates their sadness towards life and all of the perks that come along with it; and even when they do smile, or laugh, or decide to just let life’s wonders work its magic on them, it doesn’t just surprise us, but makes us happy that they themselves are actually happy as well. It makes us feel all the more closer to them and gives this story an extra oomph of emotion, that so clearly comes into play by the end.

Even when you do think that Anderson is going to get too big for his britches and get almost too dark with the possibility of suicide, he somehow comes out on-top, showing us that life, despite all of the heartbreak to be found, is still worth living, mainly due to the company you surround yourself. I mean, sure, Margot may rarely ever crack a smile, and the only time she does is when she’s around the man she loves, her brother Richie (although they do claim, on various occasions, “they aren’t related by blood”). Yeah, sure, Chas may never seem to live his life with a sign of hope or happiness, despite being surrounded by a bunch of people that do love him. And yeah, sure, Richie may look at life with a frown, despite not really having an understandable reason to. But what all of these characters have in common, isn’t just that they are apart of the same family, it’s that they have lives they don’t feel too gracious of having and most of the time, take it all for granted. However, once they realize that everything with life isn’t as bad as they unreasonably make it out to be, or that there are people with worse conditions in their life, then they can’t help but shut up, move on and crack a grin or two.

Those moments are mainly when Anderson shines the most, as well as the brightest. Making this family one you can’t help but love, although you can still take note of them being a dysfunctional bunch. Although, I for one have definitely seen worse. Just saying.

Consensus: Wes Anderson’s sense of characterization is what really makes the Royal Tenenbaums a heartfelt, hilarious, lovable and near-perfect delight to sit-through, although you never lose the sense that these are people, and not just characters written completely and totally for-the-screen. Okay, maybe that’s a bit of a stretch, but you get my drift.

9.5 / 10 = Full Price!!

Who doesn't remember the days when grand-pop used to take them on trips on the back of a garbage-truck?

Who doesn’t remember the days when grand-pop used to take them on trips on the back of a garbage-truck?

Photo’s Credit to: IMDBCollider

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32 responses to “The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

  1. Tom March 5, 2014 at 5:15 am

    Wow, the elusive 9.5 is dished out to The Royal Tenenbaums, eh?!! Awesome. Cuz i f**king love this film bro. It’s so well done. I love love love it. I think it’s the first of Anderson’s that I saw, and the one that caused me to say, ‘Hey, I like what this guy is doing.’ Gene Hackman and Gwyneth Paltrow are top-dollar in this one

  2. Shane (@filmactually) March 5, 2014 at 6:01 am

    Love love love love love this movie! Wes Anderson’s masterpiece. I like what you said about Wes Anderson’s love for his characters. You can definitely sense that here (having a phenomenal cast helps too).

  3. Shelle March 5, 2014 at 6:23 am

    I remember seeing this film and I enjoyed it.

  4. johnlink00 March 5, 2014 at 6:27 am

    I haven’t seen this in way too long. Just reading about it makes me nostalgic for it. Great explanation of the Anderson aesthetic!

  5. Terry Malloy's Pigeon Coop March 5, 2014 at 8:18 am

    Watched this for the first time the other day and loved it. I just love all the little character quirks he puts in, like the fact she’s had her finger chopped off. Does absolutely nothing for the story but just adds that little extra layer of substance to the characters. Nice review mate, really glad you liked it.

  6. Nostra March 5, 2014 at 9:06 am

    Guess I will have to revisit. Did not enjoy it all the first time, but have been loving the last couple of Anderson movies. Maybe my thoughts about it are different now.

  7. thomasjford March 5, 2014 at 10:14 am

    One of my favourite films of all time by probably my favourite director of all time! This was the first Anderson film I saw, and loved every second of it, and lapped up everything he has done before and since.

    Everything is perfect as usual, the characters, the quirks, the design and framing, the soundtrack. EVERY.DAMN.THING!!!

    My only criticism is you gave it 9.5 and not 10 haha!

  8. movierob March 5, 2014 at 11:18 am

    haven’t seen this since I saw it in the theater. don’t recall much about it.

    Nice review. I’ll have to re-watch it one of these days

  9. stephen1001 March 5, 2014 at 11:26 am

    I think Anderson’s one of those directors that the Alexander Keith’s slogan describes: “those who like him, like him a lot.” The good news is, I’m with you!

  10. whirlwindsupernova March 5, 2014 at 12:10 pm

    Great review. I love this film, it’s my favorite of his. I like the flow of the film, and the characters that partake in this. There’s never a dull moment, and I like the characters’ personalities. They’re unique and quirky in their own way, and it doesn’t get tiring. This film is the reason why I started watching Wes Anderson’s work.

  11. ckckred March 5, 2014 at 1:36 pm

    Nice review. I’ve always loved Wes Anderson’s movies and this is one of his best.

  12. charleswhitemanblogs March 5, 2014 at 3:37 pm

    NIce review. It’s been a few years since I have watched this film, so i’ll have to watch it again. His films really do grow on you and I am ecstatic for his latest.

  13. sundaydumbday March 5, 2014 at 4:52 pm

    I wholeheartedly agree Dan. This film is certainly deserving of a 9.5 if not higher and it is my favorite Wes Anderson film as well with Rushmore and Darjeeling close behind.

  14. Three Rows Back March 5, 2014 at 10:28 pm

    And so we reach Anderson’s finest hour. He has yet to top this absolutely delightful oddity. Nicely done Dan.

  15. angie chui March 6, 2014 at 9:49 am

    Call me nuts but I just wasn’t a fan of this movie. :s

  16. roobydee March 7, 2014 at 2:53 pm

    Gene Hackman absolutely slays me in this film.
    Great piece!
    Besides the charming visual style – Wes Anderson is so great at dreaming up bad people who make for the best characters.

    On my way to watch it again!

  17. Writer Loves Movies March 8, 2014 at 7:52 am

    Love your emphasis on the characters in this review. Sometimes Anderson’s visual style – which I personally love but is also divisive among audiences – can come to dominate the conversation around him. That’s something that does him a disservice I think as there is certainly a lot more to his work than that. You’ve hit the nail right on the head in this post!

  18. Popcorn Nights March 11, 2014 at 9:06 am

    Nice review Dan. I agree that this is probably his best to date, and the most memorable characters. Hackman is great here, it’s such a shame he has retired now.

  19. Pingback: Wes AnderMarch in Review | French Toast Sunday

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