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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Dogville (2003)


Always keep a lookout on those small villages.

One night in the sleepy, quiet town of Dogville, Tom (Paul Bettany), the self-appointed town spokesman, hears a gun-shot, followed by a woman arriving in his town a couple seconds later. Her name is Grace (Nicole Kidman) and she’s on the run from her mobster daddy (James Caan). Whatever the reason may be, Tom does not worry about and hides her just in the nick of time. Now that Grace is hiding out in this small town, she’s going to have to hold her own in order to stay away from the authorities, as well as not piss off any of the town-folks themselves. Grace tries to do whatever she can and at first, everything seems pitch perfect for her to be there. But once Grace starts messing up a bit and the authorities continue to breath more and more down the town’s neck, well, then the peeps themselves start to get a little wacky and wild with Grace’s presence being known and felt, and it’s Grace who ends up on the bad end of things.

The whole gimmick behind this whole film is that it all, with the exception of maybe one scene, takes place in this small town. However, the small town of Dogville isn’t what you’d expect it to be or look like. In a way to make the flick look like a stage play on screen, or to also cut down on production-costs, writer/director Lars von Trier designs the set where you can see everything, without any walls, doors, or blockades separating us from these characters and denying us the access of seeing all that they do. On top of that, the flick is also filmed with a digital-camera, which made it seem more like I could have filmed the same thing with me and my buddies. So yeah, it’s a bit hard to get used to for about the first ten or so minutes, but mind you, this is a near-three-hour flick, so take into consideration that for at least ten minutes, you may be a tad bit uncomfortable with what’s going on.

A window?!??!? First rule of von Trier-ism broken already!?!??

A window?!??!? First rule of von Trier-ism broken already!?!??

Then again though, this is a Lars von Trier film, so for those whole near-three hours, you might be uncomfortable the whole way through. And trust me, you shouldn’t be ashamed to feel so because it’s what the dude excels in the most, but here, something feels different about it all. First of all, I loved how von Trier set this story up in a way to make us feel as if we are right there in the middle of this town, right from when Grace pops herself in, to the end where the town has been practically turned inside out. It works because as the hysteria and panic within this community begins to swell-up and lose all of control, we feel the same emotions as well and it becomes a hard film to get through on many levels. One of those levels being that von Trier never strays away from showing us some dirty, messed-up stuff that he’s been planning in his head for quite some time. But like I said, something feels different about it all this time.

See, rather than feeling exploitative and provocative, just for the sake of being so, there’s a point to von Trier’s madness: To convey fear. The movie jingles on that idea every once and awhile, until the final ten minutes rolls up and takes it to the extreme, but it works because it’s so very true. Coming from a human being as well, it’s very hard to admit because this flick is inexplicably making fun of how humans react to a little bit of change, in a way that makes them go mad or insane. We, as a society, all feel the need to continue to go on with our days, the same way as if they were the way before. However, once a little diversity in that day comes around to shake things up a bit, then we lose our grips of what’s acceptable behavior and what isn’t.

I would totally like to go into a little more detail and explore why I have came to this conclusion that I have, but only going on further would spoil the movie and have you expect the unexpected, which is not what this flick is all about and surprisingly, may take the fun out of it all. I can’t say that the flick is “fun” per se, but it’s a challenging piece of work that asks you to reflect on your own minds, your own ways and your own style of living, but also asks that you take note of the next time you feel fear. How do you respond to it? Do you act irrationally? Do you keep your place in check and not lose sight of what’s really meant to be fearful of? Or, do you do nothing? The flick goes more and more in-depth with this idea than it should, but I have to say that for once, watching a von Trier movie and seeing all of the ugly stuff that he pulls out of his rump and having it all make sense and cohesive to what he’s trying to get across, I was satisfied. I was emotionally torn-up, but I was also satisfied with what von Trier brought to the forefront, to make us take a look at. It may not be something we want to even acknowledge is present in our lives, but it’s always there. Von Trier knows this; I know this; hell, everybody knows this!

You can’t escape it, because fear will always be there. No matter what.

There’s probably more themes to shake a stick at here, but this is neither the time, nor the place for me to do so. Maybe when I’m in my superficial, artsy-fartsy film class next semester, but as for right now: I have a movie to review, and performances to praise. Main one being the one from Nicole Kidman as Grace, a name that sticks so perfectly with her act and the final conclusion this flick comes to meet. Kidman’s always been a knock-out actress, there’s no questioning it. She’s always been able to take a role, however crazy or simple it may be, do whatever she wants with it, and always give us a performance that knocks all of her other ones out of the park. However, I wouldn’t have been surprised if people were a little skeptical about whether or not Kidman would be able to handle von Trier’s style or treatment of his characters, especially the female one.

"And so kids, that's what the ending to Antichrist means. Or so I think."

“And so kids, that’s what the ending to Antichrist means. Or so I think.”

However, all those skeptics can kiss Kidman’s firm-behind because she does an amazing job as Grace, giving us a performance that’s more physical than emotional. And no, that’s not me being a dirty boy. Kidman has those expressive, beautiful eyes that are able to convey any sort of emotion – whether it be sadness, forgiveness, regret, vulnerability, love, or happiness, give her an emotion to express, and she’ll do it ten times better than you’d ever expect her to do. She’s just an amazing actress, and despite her character being a bit too repetitive and weak-minded, Kidman pulls through and gives us a three-dimensional character that we care about, not just because of all this bad stuff happening to her, but because she’s the only one with a bright head on her shoulders.

Everybody else here seems to be a bit too crazy for their own good, with the exception of Paul Bettany as Thomas Edison, the philosopher and free-mind thinker of the small community that takes a liking to Grace right off the bat. Bettany’s always been a quality actor and even though I feel like his Southern-accent was a little suspect, the guy still gives us a good character that seems like he has all of the right intentions one person could want or need; he just doesn’t know what to do with them or how to show them in a way that could be suitable for both Grace and the rest of the community. Sometimes, both aspects don’t ever seem to come together, but you have hope that he’ll do the right thing no matter what, even if he does get a pushed-up against a wall many more times than one.

The rest of the heavy-stacked cast is very good too, even if nobody shines brighter than the other. They all do wonderful jobs, but it’s Kidman’s and von Trier’s show for the taking, and they won’t let you forget about it, either. Not even when the credits show up, which are some of the darkest, but hilarious credits I have ever seen scrolling in my life. Seriously, try to watch them without cracking at least a chuckle or two by the irony. The end.

Consensus: As with most of von Trier’s movies, Dogville is most likely going to be a hard pill to swallow for some, but once you get by all of the dark sexuality and titillation of the material, you’ll find yourself surprisingly compelled and interested in what von Trier has to say, whenever he gets to that breaking-point.

8.5 / 10 = Matinee!!

No wonder why everybody's so cranky and mean: No toilets!!

No wonder why everybody’s so cranky and mean! There’s no toilets!!

Photo’s Credit to: IMDBColliderComingSoon.net

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21 responses to “Dogville (2003)

  1. ninvoid99 March 20, 2014 at 4:18 am

    It’s a very avant-garde film in some respects as I think it’s one of von Trier’s best films in terms of what he wanted to say about American foreign policy and America itself despite having never traveled to the country (due to his intense fear of flying). I’m just disappointed that he’s not going to be able to make the third film of what is supposed to be a trilogy of America with Wasington to be the final part but it’s currently in limbo.

  2. Mark Walker March 20, 2014 at 7:05 am

    Outstanding film! This is Von Trier’s masterpiece.

  3. Terry Malloy's Pigeon Coop March 20, 2014 at 7:28 am

    Good review mate. Been meaning to check this one out, looks really interesting.

  4. Davide Perretta March 20, 2014 at 10:10 am

    I love this film. It’s one of my favorites!

  5. whitdenton98 March 20, 2014 at 11:44 am

    I must admit that I haven’t seen any thing Von Trier has done, but this looks interesting. And Nicole Kidman is usually great. Terrific write up Dan!

  6. Russel DDK March 20, 2014 at 12:58 pm

    Not a big fan of Nicole Kidman, but she was really good in this. Von Tier’s Direction is great as usual. Nice review, Dan.

  7. Nostra March 20, 2014 at 1:16 pm

    It was the first Von Trier’s movie I saw and I was impressed by it. The stage look makes the performances stand out more and it was captivating the whole way through. Great writeup man.

  8. Brittani March 20, 2014 at 1:27 pm

    God, I hate this movie, but your review was great and made it sound a lot better than I actually thought it was. lol. Kidman and Bettany gave great performances, that’s for sure. I just can’t to Von Trier.

  9. thegreatcatsby01 March 20, 2014 at 2:54 pm

    Great to see all the love for Lars, a supremely underrated director who’s every film embodies the mantra of “f**k the haters!”. Cracking review as well.

  10. charleswhitemanblogs March 20, 2014 at 3:20 pm

    I’ve past over this film for quite some time now, going to have to watch it. Thanks for the push!

  11. Joan Fuchsman March 20, 2014 at 4:00 pm

    Even though I like your review, I would have to disagree with it. When I saw this at the Telluride Film Festival, I absolutely hated it. I’ve never been able to get the image of Nicole Kidman, an actress I truly love, in a dog collar and being treated worse than a dog, out of my mind.I always wondered if she knew what she was getting into before she signed on:-)

  12. chris2508 March 20, 2014 at 4:38 pm

    A really good review. Never heard of this one, sounds intriguing.

  13. vinnieh March 20, 2014 at 5:20 pm

    Excellent review, you’ve got me intrigued to see it.

  14. Three Rows Back March 20, 2014 at 10:42 pm

    Glad to see you enjoyed this as much as I did. Great review Dan.

  15. thomasjford March 20, 2014 at 10:47 pm

    I don’t usually turn movies off before the end. This one I did. I’ve discounted everything Von Trier has done since. Doesn’t interest me. Your review may persuade me to give it another crack though!

  16. Anna (Film Grimoire) March 21, 2014 at 4:54 am

    Yep, you’ve convinced me, I officially have to see this now. Great review!

  17. timneath March 21, 2014 at 8:42 pm

    Great review, I wanna see this film if nothing more for the production design, anything else will just enrich the experience.

  18. Jim Turnbull March 21, 2014 at 10:25 pm

    Great review bud! My favourite Von Trier hands down. So unique. Definitely not an easy watch, but like you said, compelling!

  19. yyanchev March 22, 2014 at 6:34 am

    This is indeed a great movie by a great director. Very good review!

  20. Pass the Popcorn! March 28, 2014 at 2:25 pm

    Hey Dan, nice review! Dogville is my favorite von Trier movie (mostly due to how it deals with human nature) and I loved reading your take on it!

    Dorian

  21. Pingback: » Movie Review – Grace Of Monaco Fernby Films

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