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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes (2014)


Apes on horses. That’s all I’ve got to say.

Set ten years after where the first one ended, in the wake of the ALZ-113 virus, practically all civilization on Earth has been wiped out. Now all that seems to be left is nature itself; most importantly, the apes themselves who live out in the wilderness where they belong, led by the one and only ape who should be leading them, Caesar (Andy Serkis). The apes have been living pretty comfortably there for quite some time, so when they discover that humans are still alive and living in the city, they get a little worried. However, Caesar does not want to start a war, so he keeps the peace so long as the humans stay on their side of the bridge, and they will do the same. However, the humans need some help that makes it difficult to stay out the apes’ way: There’s apparently a generator that can bring back all of the electricity to the city, that also happens to be located right underneath the major dam. Which, in case you couldn’t tell by now, is located directly in the woods. Caesar is not happy with this, but he’s able to connect with a human (Jason Clarke) that shows the two species can trust each other. That is, until one ape, Koba (Toby Kebbell), sees Caesar’s willingness to allow the humans on their turf as some sort of weakness and decides that it’s his time to shine and take things into his own hands.

Meaning one thing and one thing only…..WAR!!

So yeah, Rise was a pretty solid re-boot that showed not only was there some life left in this near-extinct franchise, but that there was plenty more opportunity to build from there. Because, if you think about it, you could make any story seem fresh or inventive, just so long as you have the apes involved. Take out the apes, and you have a pretty standard movie that we’ve seen a hundred times before. But with the apes, though, well there’s something special about that and I think that’s exactly why this movie works just as much, if not more than the first.

"What? Is it something on my face?"

“What? Is it something on my face?”

And I think the main element to what makes that such is the fact that Matt Reeves is director here and the guy’s got some chops. Say what you will about Cloverfield, but he’s probably the only guy who can easily say he’s made one of the best American horror-remake of the past decade, come from writing a such a sappy, melodramatic show like Felicity, and yet still be able to deliver on a big-budget, action spectacle such as this. But what makes Reeves’ direction so much more impressive is the fact that he has to do a whole lot here, without losing focus – he has to keep the action, the violence and the overall carnage up to keep people satisfied, while still be able to give us those spare emotional moments that have us feel something for these characters when all goes wrong. Because, as we all know, it certainly will.

And while it’s evident that Reeves sort of slips up on giving this movie more of a point than just, “Don’t be mean to others, guys!”, there’s still a whole lot more emotional baggage that I felt delivered in ways I wasn’t expecting. Sure, we’ve seen the story of Caesar before, but what about him now as a leader? An ape that has a lot more on his plate than before. Because not only is he the head ape of this whole clan, he’s possibly the head ape of his whole species and it’s all up to him to keep the peace amongst the group, make the right choices, and ensure that not all of it goes to waste because of a mess-up here, or a mess-up there.

In a way, too, Andy Serkis is a lot like Caesar; not only does Caesar himself play a way bigger role this time around, but Serkis’ name even gets top-billing as well. To me, Serkis will always be remembered for what he does in these motion-capture performances and rightfully so: He’s able to give a voice to these characters who seemingly have none. Though Caesar does do an awful lot of a Hulk-talk throughout this movie (“Human bad. Ape good.”), there are still many moments in which we just see Caesar either speaking to others in sign-language, or just by looking at someone, for some reason. However, the reason is never a mystery to us because with every stare, every glance that Caesar the character gives a fellow character, Serkis brings so much drama; so much so that we never exactly know whether Caesar is going to lose his shit, or just take a much-needed nap.

That said, it should definitely be noted that Serkis isn’t the only one donning the green spandex-suit and getting away with it, because there are quite a few other relatively big names that do splendid work as well. Though Koba is essentially a one-note bastard, Toby Kebbell does a great job at giving him enough reason behind the menace to make you understand why an ape like him would take absolute matters into his own hands, as risky as they may sometimes be. Judy Greer is also using mo-cap here as Caesar’s wife/baby-momma and is fine, although it is unfortunate that we don’t actually get to see her in this movie, because what a pleasure that would have been.

Oh well, I guess these annoying-ass Sprint Family Plan commercials will have to do for now. Ugh.

Anyway, mostly everything I said about the ape characters, can be said for the human characters, although they’re filled with more recognizable faces and names. Jason Clarke is practically filling in for Franco as a peacekeeper named Malcolm. We never really get to know much about his character other than that he lost some of those close to him when the virus swept the nation, as well as that he’s able to at least communicate and stay calm with the apes, but with Clarke, that’s enough as is. The dude’s a solid actor and always makes it seem like he’s a genuinely nice guy, who just wants what’s best for his people, so long so as nobody has to get hurt. And as for Franco, well, much has been made about him apparently showing up in this movie, and I have to say, without saying all that much, he does. And unsurprisingly, it’s the most emotionally-wrenching scene of the whole movie.

Damn that Franco. The dude isn’t even credited as being in the movie, yet, somehow leaves the biggest impression.

Typical Franco-fashion.

As for the rest of the human characters, they’re fine, though not as deep as Clarke’s Malcolm in the middle – Keri Russell plays his gal-pal who also happens to be a doctor at the most opportune times; Kodi Smit-McPhee plays the teenage son who draws pictures and reads Charles Burns’ Black Hole (highly recommended read from yours truly), which already gives you the impression that this kid has seen some messed-up stuff and is trying to express himself in any creative way to block it all out, or just that he’s a messed-up kid in general; Kirk Acevedo plays, yet again, a spineless dick that has some truth to what he says, but is so aggressive about it, you sort of just want to give him a Benadryl; and Gary Oldman does what he can with his limited-role as the leader of these humans by digging deep into what makes this human, well, human.

"Come on, bro. You're an ape, I'm an ape, let's just be ape for one another."

“Come on, bro. You’re an ape, I’m an ape, let’s just be ape for one another.”

Typical Oldman-fashion. So suck on that, Franco!

However, I’ve realized that I’ve gotten further and further away from the point of this movie, and that’s that it’s a pretty solid summer blockbuster if I’ve ever seen one. Reeves doesn’t back down when he has to allow his movie to get a tad bit insane (apes on horses, that’s all I’m saying), but he finds a neat balance in allowing there to be these small, quiet humane scenes of drama that feel honest, rather than thrown-in to give this story some more of a purpose. Many blockbusters nowadays are guilty of this, but somehow, Reeves is smarter than that; he knows his story is about apes and humans trying to get along, but somehow just can’t. Yet, he isn’t afraid to go a step further and show us that the fear isn’t with these apes coming over to our land and taking over, but how most of us humans would react. Some would run and hide, while others would probably stay and fight for what they believe in.

Whatever your choice is, it doesn’t matter. Because these apes, they’re kicking ass, taking names and, occasionally, being nice to those humans who realize there’s more to them than just a bunch of hairy specimens. They have souls, feelings and all sorts of emotions. That’s not to say that they’re like you or me, but hey, they come pretty close.

Got your back, Darwin.

Consensus: While it’s not nearly as deep as it clearly wants to be, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes still messes around with plenty ideas, while simultaneously giving us enough action, spectacle, fun, and emotion to make this story, as well as these characters, human or not, feel worth getting invested in.

8.5 / 10 = Matinee!!

"Caesar here!"

“Caesar here!”

Photo’s Credit to: Goggle Images

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26 responses to “Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes (2014)

  1. le0pard13 July 12, 2014 at 3:30 am

    We’re in very much agreement re: Reeves’ Let Me In. Fine review, and I’m very much looking forward to this.

  2. 55theintimidator55 July 12, 2014 at 3:52 am

    I was wondering where your review was a few minutes ago because you keep seeing these things on opening day. Good review. I enjoyed it as well although I think it did miss on some points but there were so many points it was trying to hit on at the same time.

  3. Tom July 12, 2014 at 4:45 am

    Great review Dan! I”m super pumped to go see this tomorrow — that is, right after I catch up on watching Rise of the Planet of the Apes first. I can’t believe I haven’t seen any of these movies, but I’ve been hearing nothing but great things. Sounds like this one’s more intense

  4. Wendell July 12, 2014 at 5:17 am

    So far, I’m hearing nothing but great things about this. I’m looking forward to seeing it.

  5. Joseph@thecinemamonster July 12, 2014 at 6:14 am

    Just out of the theatre and I must say it’s pretty damn entertaining! A lot of love to Serkis, the man’s a magician. Also, Toby Kebbell is magnificent. Definitely one to keep an eye on for the next couple of years. Excellent review, Dan!

  6. falcon760 July 12, 2014 at 6:28 am

    Messing around with ideas is better than most. I like this review. Good job.

  7. No More Workhorse July 12, 2014 at 6:33 am

    I was worried this would be rubbish, with new director etc. Looking forward to it again now! Yeah…

  8. Okey Chima July 12, 2014 at 6:37 am

    Reblogged this on maxichimaximind and commented:
    Beautiful review – cant wait to see it.

  9. davecrewe July 12, 2014 at 7:54 am

    “And while it’s evident that Reeves sort of slips up on giving this movie more of a point than just, “Don’t be mean to others, guys!”, there’s still a whole lot more emotional baggage that I felt delivered in ways I wasn’t expecting.”

    I don’t totally agree with this – I think Reeves (and the screenwriters, really) manage to work in some ideas related to historical conflict, colonialism and the danger of high-powered weaponry without totally stepping on the film’s effectiveness as entertainment. The fact that he manages to pull such emotion, rather than spectacle, out of the big action sequences is testament to this.

    Minor quibble aside, love the review 🙂

  10. Three Rows Back July 12, 2014 at 10:37 am

    Awesome. CANNOT WAIT to see this!

  11. Thomas July 12, 2014 at 11:43 am

    Reblogged this on thomasfilmblog and commented:
    Great Review of Dawn of The Planet of The Apes.

  12. Logan Burd July 12, 2014 at 1:14 pm

    In “Rise,” James Franco was the Kristen Stewart of male actors. He has absolutely no emotion. You can tell he’s not talking to an ape. “Dawn” is infinitely more incredible. It doesn’t feel the need to sacrifice story for incredible action or vice-versa, it has both!
    Check out my review and see what you think! http://allihavetosayaboutthat.wordpress.com/2014/07/11/dawn-of-the-planet-of-the-apes-2014/

  13. MovieManJackson July 12, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    Flat out loved this. I do think it is a little deeper than you thought, but at any rate at the core this is an amazing summer blockbuster. Great review.

  14. rgagne July 12, 2014 at 5:48 pm

    This was a fantastic movie! For me Caesar has turned into the Optimus Prime of the Apes, such a heroic leader. Great review Dan.

  15. Chris July 13, 2014 at 4:51 pm

    lol, love your little tangent on Franco here. Really enjoyed this one. Nice review, Dan. 🙂

  16. Brian H (Movies After Dark) July 13, 2014 at 9:28 pm

    I’m writing my review as I type out this comment! Great review Dan.

  17. Mark Hobin July 14, 2014 at 4:01 am

    Agreed. It’s a pretty solid summer blockbuster. The apes were actually better written as characters than the humans. That’s ok though because they were a major part of the film. I really enjoyed this. I mean apes on horses? I‘m all for it!

  18. CinemaClown July 14, 2014 at 2:34 pm

    Amazing review as always, Dan. Really looking forward to this one!

  19. Robert (totheescapehatch.com) July 15, 2014 at 2:43 am

    Great review. I had completely forgotten what else Matt Reeves had done. No wonder the movie turned out so good.

  20. Zoë July 15, 2014 at 7:15 am

    Awesome review Dan. Can’t wait to get to this one over the weekend!

  21. Pingback: Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Review | The Mind of Shadow

  22. Tim The Film Guy July 25, 2014 at 7:30 pm

    Had to bookmark the reviews again. Only just saw the film.

    Great review. The film is an excellent visual and conceptual improvement of the first and that’s impressive in its own right. And Andy Serkis retains his Title as the master of motion capture.

    “Apes. Together. Strong.”

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  24. Pingback: » Movie Review – Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes Fernby Films

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