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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Life Itself (2014)


Yup. Two Thumbs Up.

For some people, Roger Ebert was just a guy who watched an awful lot of movies, and said whether or not he liked them by going “thumbs up”, or “thumbs down”. But to others, he was more than just a film critic; he was a man who genuinely loved what it was that he did and found anyway he could to make it better. Whether it was by posting a positive review on a movie that barely anyone had ever heard about, or by just speaking his mind and not backing down from when others went against him, Roger Ebert had opinions and thoughts, and he wasn’t going to back off from speaking his mind and letting the world know about what he thought. Of course though, as with most humans, Roger ran into some problems with his excessive drinking, but soon found happiness in the form of one woman named Chaz, who he falls in love with and gets married too. Right from there on, Roger realizes that there’s more to life than just movies; sometimes, you have to care for others and continue on the legacy of good-tidings. Of course though, he never forgot about the movies. Not even until the day he tragically passed away at the age of 70.

I feel like if you’ve lived long enough, or have at least paid enough attention to movies as a whole, you know a thing or two about Roger Ebert and the type of influence he has on most people who watch movies. And I’m not just talking about the critiques who just about everybody despises, I’m talking about a natural, everyday film-goer. For awhile too, Roger was the premier film critic that everybody paid attention, and actually listened to, regardless of if they fully agreed with his end rating of a movie or not.

And seeing as how I was a big fan of Roger Ebert, his reviews, At the Movies (even throughout its numerous incarnations that didn’t involve Roger himself), and film criticism as a whole, I knew that this was really going to pull at my heart. After all, without Roger Ebert, there probably would have never been a DTMMR to begin with, and thus, there wouldn’t have been an excuse behind all my countless hours of sitting in front of keyboards and screens.

What the hell is that "thing" he's holding in his hand?!?!

What the hell is that “thing” he’s holding in his hand?!?!

But like I said before about this movie, it’s meant to be made for anybody who was ever touched by Roger and what it was that he did and that’s why most of this flick works. Director Steve James knows that most of us connect Roger to At the Movies, with George Siskel of course, which is primarily why he focuses so much time on that aspect of his life. We see how him and Siskel sometimes got along and sometimes didn’t, both on and off the screen. They didn’t hate each other, yet they didn’t love each other either; they were just two guys who loved the absolute hell out of movies, and were never willing to settle for the other’s opinion.

In all honesty, it’s probably the most interesting part of this documentary; in fact, dare I say it, we could have probably had a whole documentary about their beginnings together and how they, with time, eventually got to like one another and be somewhat considered “pals”. There’s true, honest and real human drama in the stories we are told by those closest to the both of them and whenever James puts his focus on them and lets that story play-out, it’s easily what makes this documentary so interesting to watch and listen to. Even if it is apparent that it’s more about their relationship, and less about Roger and his life, it still glues you in to what you hear next, and by whom.

With that said though, it isn’t like every territory James explores that has to do with Roger and his own personal life isn’t interesting at all, it just sort of pales in comparison. However, there’s still plenty of interesting detours James takes with this documentary and with Ebert’s life that makes things more compelling. For instance, James highlights the fact that Ebert was something of a hero to those that made the movies he reviewed. He was more than just a dude who sat in front of a screen, watched something, and then dissected it moments later; he’s like as I’d like to imagine every other film critic, professional or nonprofessional – a man who truly loves his craft and the business in which he works around. And because of that, he would constantly champion certain movies by certain directors, and give those movies more exposure than they could have ever expected before in their lives.

Because, if there was anybody a common, everyday citizen was going to listen to when it came to “what’s good?”, and “what’s not?”, it sure as hell was Roger Ebert. And sure as hell not some 20-something blogger….

But what really hits us hard is when we see these certain stories told to us by the likes of Ramin Bahrani, Ava DuVernay, and even Errol Morris, who show that if it wasn’t for Roger, they would practically have no film career to begin with; Bahrani himself even goes so far as to befriend Ebert and his whole family! This all truly shows you not only the importance of film criticism in general, but what it really does matter for when somebody sees your movie and talks about it. It doesn’t matter if it totally blows, or is the next best thing since Citizen Kane – it’s a film that, for the most part, is worth seeing. It could touch somebody’s life, while not do anything for another. You never know, and that’s why the art of film deserves to exist in a world such as this.

The man truly is a legend. Not once batting an eye while a Marilyn stand-up glares at him right in the face.

Not once batting an eye away from his work while a Marilyn stand-up glares at him in the face. The man truly was a legend.

Like I was saying though, James doesn’t always hit the mark when he’s exploring Ebert’s life and totally forgets to go even deeper into certain parts that I would have liked a little bit more clarification on (most definitely his later-years when he was diagnosed and before he passed away), but it’s the disease itself that James really goes on and on about, in a respectable, but bold manner. He doesn’t shy away from showing us the harsh living conditions Roger, Chaz, and the rest of his family has to live through in order to keep him alive, and he sure as hell doesn’t shy away from showing us just how hard it is for all of them to have to go on with it, day after day, but it’s the reality of the situation as presented to us. I’m sure there were many people out there who had no freakin’ clue at all about how truly painful or serious this illness was and for that, I’d definitely like to commend James. Not only does he highlight those last few months/years for Roger that may have not been the best of his life, but it shows us that he hardly ever gave up on doing what he loved most: Watching and reviewing movies.

For, if it wasn’t for him, there wouldn’t be hardly near as many film critics out there as we have today. And, for better, as well as for worse, we have that to thank him for.

Or better yet, give him a solid thumbs up.

Thank you, Roger.

Consensus: While not a perfect documentary, Life Itself still gives us a glimpse into the life of Roger Ebert who made a career out of speaking his mind, loving what it was that he did and always, I repeat, always making sure that the business in which he worked in continued to get better and better, even after he was long gone. And I think it’s safe to say that, on his part, mission complete.

8 / 10 = Matinee!!

Only takes one weirdo sitting in the last-row to ruin the whole movie-going experience.

Only takes one weirdo sitting in the last-row to ruin the whole movie-going experience.

Photo’s Credit to: Goggle Images

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32 responses to “Life Itself (2014)

  1. JustMeMike July 27, 2014 at 4:27 am

    Wonderful Read Dan. Good stuff indeed.

  2. Mark Hobin July 27, 2014 at 4:40 am

    Seems like every critic has a personal story about Ebert. I used to watch Sneak Previews when I was very little. Ebert, a writer with the Chicago Sun-Times, would co-host along with Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune. As far as I was concerned you couldn’t mention one without the other. They spoke intelligently about movies but at a level where even a child could still understand. I enjoyed the back and forth when they would disagree, even more than the actual review. No one has ever duplicated their chemistry. I miss them both.

  3. Brian H (Movies After Dark) July 27, 2014 at 6:31 am

    Great review. I’m usually not much for documentaries, but this one has caught my attention. My mom would always go to his reviews when deciding to watch a movie or not. I guess it rubbed off on me. It was a sad day when he passed.

  4. CinemaClown July 27, 2014 at 7:16 am

    He’s an inspiration to so many of us… for he turned what was just another weekly column writing into an art form. We all owe him a lot. All of us.

    Great review as always, Dan.

  5. killkenny16 July 27, 2014 at 8:28 am

    Great revuew man!

    I only began following Roger Ebert in the months leading up to his death, which I learned about suddenly while checking my phone for news updates at school. What a shock that was. It felt like he had taught me so much about movies, and I had really only read a handful of his reviews at some point. The man was just so happy doing what he did, it was inspiring.

  6. Jordan Richardson July 27, 2014 at 10:57 am

    Tremendous review, Dan. This one’s on my list for sure.

  7. Joan Fuchsman July 27, 2014 at 11:38 am

    I really enjoyed your review, Dan. I also thought the film was very good. Learning about his early life was extremely interesting to me. But the way he lived his life at the end was amazing. It’s sad that cancer cut both Siskel’s and Ebert’s lives short.
    Joan

  8. Anna (Film Grimoire) July 27, 2014 at 2:29 pm

    Wonderful review Dan. Really looking forward to seeing this one!

  9. Tom July 27, 2014 at 4:34 pm

    Great review dude, I’m eager to watch these even though I’ve really disagreed with a lot of Ebert’s stuff. But hey — that’s what makes this whole process fun, isn’t it? We can’t all be saying the same things. I’m anxious about the latter part of the film, where it shows him declining in health, though. That sounds pretty nasty. But I respect James for including it and Roger Ebert for not shying away from the reality of the situation either. I dearly miss that man, even despite hardly ever aligning on opinions

    • CMrok93 July 27, 2014 at 6:22 pm

      Film criticism is all about opinions and certain views going up against one another. If nobody had that, there wouldn’t be such a thing as film criticism in the first place. We’d just all be a bunch of sheep, flocking to the next movie because it’s in our conscience. Meaning, disagreeing with somebody, is a fact of life. That’s what made Ebert so special. Thanks man!

  10. thomasjford July 27, 2014 at 5:28 pm

    I’ve got this to watch, looking forward to seeing it. Nice review Dan

  11. Marshall July 27, 2014 at 5:59 pm

    The Scorsese thing didn’t get to you enough to merit a mention? Man, I got choked up during his interview.

  12. #peggyatthemovies July 27, 2014 at 7:59 pm

    I am sometimes surprised how much we think the same on movies.. this one is no different.. Love your review.. 🙂 http://peggyatthemovies.com/2014/07/04/readreview-of-life-itself/

  13. Zach Murphy (@zkmurph) July 27, 2014 at 11:29 pm

    I absolutely loved this documentary. Everyone should see it.

  14. Jeff Stewart July 27, 2014 at 11:35 pm

    Great review about a great documentary about an exceptional person, while I agree with you no two-hour piece could fully detail Ebert’s impact or methods on film criticism and criticism as whole, James seeks to give us the full unfiltered picture of the man, just as Roger would’ve wanted it to be. Depicting as the title says, with all the blemishes and flaws right along-side with the triumphs and accolades of man who just loved his work, it is so simple and moving. I think that in and of its self puts it above of normal ‘fluff’ pieces on celebrities and personalities. Two thumbs high up indeed.

  15. Courtney July 28, 2014 at 4:40 pm

    Great review! This doc has been on my mind after reading a few reviews on it, so I definitely need to add it to my to-watch list. The man is a legend!

  16. ckckred July 29, 2014 at 1:00 pm

    Nice review. This is an excellent documentary for sure, even though it glosses over a few things in Roger’s life.

  17. Pingback: Vale – Paul Cox |

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