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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Selma (2014)


Believe it or not, there’s actually more words after, “I have a dream“.

In 1965, racial tensions in the United States were very high, most importantly though, in the South. A region of the country in which, even though blacks were legally allowed to vote, they still had to jump through all sorts of law abiding rules and regulations that was obviously set out to make sure that their race, and only theirs, wouldn’t be allowed to vote and therefore, not have their voices be heard like any other citizen. This is when Martin Luther King, Jr. (David Oyelowo) decided that it was time to step in and allow for his voice to not only be heard, but acted on as well. Most importantly though, MLK travels Selma, Alabama of all places to arrange a march that would not only get the attention of everybody’s eyes and ears, but also President Lyndon B. Johnson (Tom Wilkinson)’s, and would hopefully drive him to make some severe changes to the voting-process. Although, as one could expect, LBJ wasn’t always down to change certain voting restrictions, especially with the looming pressure of possible voters and fellow confidantes like George Wallace (Tim Roth), J. Edgar Hoover (Dylan Baker), and Lee C. White (Giovanni Ribisi), among many others.

Every girl truly does go crazy for a sharp-dressed man.

Every girl truly does go crazy for a sharp-dressed man.

Contrary to what some may believe, Selma isn’t necessarily a biopic about MLK, his life, his achievements, and everything else that transpired when he was alive, and what soon followed afterwards. Instead, it’s much more of a film in which a good portion of MLK’s life is documented, yet, never fully chronicled to make it just his, and his own; there’s plenty more people apart of this story, helping out to create a larger, more thought-out picture than just being standard. The same could actually be said for the civil rights movement(s) that Selma seems to portray – it wasn’t just one person who is single-handedly credited with all of the accomplishments, it’s everybody who was there to help that one person out and make sure that his dreams were fulfilled, as risky as they sometimes may have been.

And in the world that we live in now, honestly, Selma couldn’t be anymore relevant. And to be honest, director Ava DuVernay fully knows this, which is why this movie hits as hard as it does, but without ever seeming like it’s pandering in any sort of way. Surely DuVernay sees and understands the civil rights movement as a significant time in our history (as well as she should), but rather than making it a simple and easy history lesson that any fifth-grader could teach to a class of hundred or more, she strives for something more difficult and ambitious. While DuVernay portrays the civil rights movement, and those behind it all, as smart and inspiring, she also shows that the tactics that would eventually land most of these participants in hot water, not just with the government, but with fellow members of their own race.

For white people who got involved with the civil rights movement, they suffered threats, day-in and day-out from fellow Caucasians who believed that it wasn’t their right to get involved. The black people suffered this, too, and definitely a lot more worse, but as the movie portrays it, it wasn’t just the white people that blacks had to deal with on a regular basis, it was actually some people of their own race. DuVernay shows this with the inclusion of Malcolm X, and as small as it may have been, it’s a smart move on her part to show that some people preferred to side with X’s way of violence solving any and all problems, whereas some others preferred to stick with MLK’s way of not fighting back and instead, using peace as the best medicine to ridicule those who use violence to their benefit. In a lesser film, each and every person of the same race would have gathered, hand-in-hand, and marched happily together, but in DuVernay’s much smarter film, sometimes, they’re at-war with themselves.

But this is just me getting further and further away from what Selma really does here, and that’s portray a brutal, yet significant time in our society’s history, without ever shying away from some of the more dark and dirty aspects that would push certain people away from seeing this. We’ve seen white cops beating on black people in movies (and sadly, in real-life, too) done before, but the way in how DuVernay shows the sheer terror and madness is not only disturbing, but downright terrifying. It not only opens our eyes a little more to what this film is setting out to do, but also puts into perspective what is really being fought for here, rather than just telling us and trusting that bit of info as is.

Like I mentioned before, though, there’s a good portion of this movie that likes to argue against what most of us may know, or think we know, about the civil rights movement and how all those apart of it acted. For instance, not every person in this film is a clear-cut good guy, or a bad guy; they’re, simply put, just people that had a foot in history and all had their own goals, whether they may, or may not be desirable to us watching at home. This is especially clear in the case of LBJ who yes, definitely seems like a racist, but is also a politician, meaning, that he knows he has a lot at stake here in terms of his voting numbers come re-election time. While it’s made clear to us that maybe LBJ’s morals aren’t in the right places, he is still trying to give MLK what he wants, just in his own way. They may not be perfect and they may not always get the job done, but they’re still efforts on his part and that’s more than he can say for many other white politicians during that time.

The same said for LBJ, could definitely be said for MLK, which is definitely surprising considering that you’d expect a piece praising the figure for everything that he did while he was alive, and the influence that still holds precedence in our society today. DuVernay instead dives a bit deeper into the man of MLK, what made him who he was, and how exactly he got through this tough time in his life. And with this, we see that he wasn’t always the perfect man; he was a shitty husband who fooled-around a bit too much, didn’t always step to the front-line like he had initially promised, and got a little big-headed for his own good. But nonetheless, MLK was MLK, a man who accomplished more than what anybody expected of him when he was alive, and it’s a true testament to the person he was, rather than the person people want us to see and believe in.

Round 2. Fight!!

Round 2. Fight!!

Doesn’t make him any less of a good person, it just makes him a person, first and foremost.

And as MLK, David Oyelowo is pretty outstanding. This isn’t too surprising considering Oyelowo has been churning out amazing performances for the past couple years or so, but it truly is great to see him tackle a role that so many people think we already all think we know of, and do something different with it. Because MLK isn’t made out to be the most perfect human specimen ever created in this movie, we see certain shades to his persona that we don’t get to see in his speeches; sure, the speeches are here and they are downright compelling to watch and listen to, but they aren’t what make this person. What makes this person is that he stood up for what he believed in and, at any cost, tried to make his dream a reality. He had many of bumps in the road, but ultimately, he prevailed in getting what he wanted, even if he definitely did gain some enemies in the meantime. Then again, who doesn’t?

Though there’s more to the cast where that came from and rightfully so, too. The previously mentioned LBJ is done well by Tom Wilkinson who fits perfectly into the role and constantly makes it seem like this man is going to explode at any second; Carmen Ejogo has a few strong scenes as MLK’s wife, Corette, and shows the painful side to being the one who is constantly left-at-home, when your significant other is off, fighting the good fight, and constantly allowing you and the rest of your family to be threatened; Tim Roth is pretty damn campy as the overtly-racist man that was George Wallace, although he does with it just enough scenery-chewing that there’s no need for the mustache-twirl; and honestly, plenty more where that came from.

In fact, so many more to talk about that to put one over the other would just be an absolute disservice to each and every performer who shows up here, ready to perform and give it their all with their roles, no matter how small or large they may be. But above all though, it’s DuVernay who deserves the most credit for handling this large ensemble and giving just about every member something substantial to do and add another layer onto a story that, quite frankly, is already very engaging to begin with. Although there are plenty of hiccups to be found on the road leading to the final-act here, DuVernay still brings us a solid depiction of the Selma marches, how they affected us as a society then, and how they do it to us now. Because seriously, the years may change, but the stories remain the same.

Who knows when the change will come. Let’s just hope it’s soon.

Consensus: Smart, powerful, and well-acted by just about everybody involved, Selma is a complex, detailed-look into the civil rights movement that knows it’s important, but never shoves it down its viewer’s throats.

8.5 / 10 = Matinee!!

When they mean "strength in numbers"? Like, specifically, how many are we talking about here?

When they mean “strength in numbers”? Like, specifically, how many are we talking about here?

Photo’s Credit to: IMDB, AceShowbiz

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16 responses to “Selma (2014)

  1. MovieManJackson January 11, 2015 at 4:21 am

    Great read Dan. I too mostly enjoyed the story, as it really served to give some inside knowledge into King and others in his stable in a way that lectures or textbooks sometimes fail do do.

  2. The Celtic Predator January 11, 2015 at 4:29 am

    I honestly didn’t think the LBJ-portrayal was that offensive (though it may be historically inaccurate, I don’t know—I’m not a presidential historian…), as I found him to be a complex, believable politician character. “You have 1 important issue, I got a 101!” Sounds pretty credible to me 😛 Also, I loved his scene with Tim Roth’s Alabama governor. “Why don’t you just let the n***ers vote?!”

    Also, good on point out the complexity of MLK’s character. That was something I initially glossed over in theatres as I didn’t find the movie too fascinating overall. However, I am a bit bugged the way everyone seems to think of Malcolm X as a violent anarchist when he really wasn’t at all — he was just racist in his own way for a long time and lacked the political correctness MLK passionately clung to.

  3. JustMeMike January 11, 2015 at 4:33 am

    Well done Dan –

    This is a serious review of a serious film. As you and I both described it, 1965 was dark and troubling year in America. DuVernay has done a terrific job in capturing that milieu and bringing it to life for those who have only read about it, in the school history books.. The film has historical inaccuracies, but what event, be it a film or something as mundane where were you yesterday morning is bound to have inaccuracies..

    History is just the collected perspectives of many- be it events from 50 years ago, or last Sunday’s football games. There is reality of course, but memories are only our personal recollections and accuracy has nothing to do with it.

    I am sure that I will watch this film again. It was that good.

  4. Carly January 11, 2015 at 4:50 am

    Great job. I was hesitant to see this movie at first, but after reading your review, I think I might. I have heard people (especially historians) complain that the white men in this movie were portrayed as demonic a-holes, and that LBJ was nothing like that in real life (my history buff dad told me LBJ was a bit of a nutter butter, but nothing like in the movie).

    First things first, it’s a Hollywood movie. Inaccuracy is inevitable.But even if Selma is historically inaccurate, its themes are relevant, and we need more history movies that are less like textbook readings and that capture the time period in a way modern audiences can understand. I always got the same MLK stuff fed to me in school and never learned about his march in Selma. Booo.

    Also, unreleated fun fact but my birthday is on the anniversary of MLK’s I Have a Dream speech. Awesome. Sorry I’m rambling.

  5. Keith January 11, 2015 at 4:50 am

    I actually think it could have been more relevant if it hadn’t taken some crazy historical liberties. Dr. King along with his passion, courage, and leadership is all shown in powerful ways. But why intentionally warp the LBJ character? Odd choices that slightly undercut the film.

  6. Reid Anita January 11, 2015 at 4:52 pm

    Dan, this is very well written. Nice job. Am going to see the movie.

  7. ianthecool January 11, 2015 at 7:19 pm

    lol The villain actually does a mustache twirl?

  8. The Hot Rod January 12, 2015 at 12:23 am

    Another film I’m dead keen to see. Great review, my friend.

  9. Tom January 13, 2015 at 7:33 am

    I have to agree with Keith up above, and actually I think it was his review that pointed something out to me: ‘Selma’ needlessly skews LBJ to make a further point that virtually every single white man was against the black man. That’s just not true. Im pretty concerned about the way Tom Wilkinson portrays the guy, even though ultimately I know it will be an issue with the script rather than how he conveys LBJ’s imperfect President in this trying time.

    Good work Dan. An 8.5 is pretty awesome to see all the same.

  10. Mark Hobin January 13, 2015 at 8:29 am

    A powerful film that brilliantly documents a specific moment in time. Loved it: http://fastfilmreviews.com/2015/01/02/selma/

  11. Jim Turnbull January 18, 2015 at 2:59 am

    Great review, man. Can’t wait to catch this one!

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