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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

The Guest (2014)


As long as they’re in the Army, let ’em in! Or don’t. Actually, yeah. Don’t do that.

One day, completely out of the blue, David Andersen Collins (Dan Stevens) knocks on the Peterson’s front-door and tells them that not only did he serve in the Army with their deceased family-member, but that he was also there for said family-member’s final breathing moment. All David wants to do is stop by, pay his regards, and keep on moving to wherever the hell he’s going, but Laura (Sheila Kelley), the mother of the family, would like for him to stay. She clearly misses her son and if there’s anything at all close to him that she can still get, she’ll keep it for as long as humanly possible. So for awhile, David stays in the house, doing chores, keeping an eye on what happens to the younger kids in the house when they go to school, and overall, just being there to lend a helping hand whenever he’s needed. While the youngest (Brendan Meyer) clearly doesn’t have a problem with this, the older sister, Anna (Maika Monroe), clearly does and isn’t too sure whether she can actually trust David. And then she realizes something very strange about his past, and it puts his whole existence into perspective.

With You’re Next, writer Simon Barrett and director Adam Wingard gave us a movie that lived, slept, and breathed the same air as an 80’s home-invasion flick. However, at the same time, it was still eerily present and because of that, it felt like something new, exciting and relatively original. Of course a good amount of the credit for that film working as well as it did was because of the unpredictable plot that kept on surprising us every step of the way, without ever throwing us down too many random hallways, but where it mattered most, Wingard and Barrett seemed to be making a movie that they clearly wanted to use as both as a tribute to the home-invasion thrillers of yesteryear. By doing so, too, they also made a near-perfect home-invasion thriller in its own right that people, like I imagine Barrett and Wingard were once doing, will be talking about for many, many years to come.

The Guest doesn’t quite hit that peak, but it does come pretty close at times.

Relax over there, ladies.

Relax over there, ladies.

As they did with You’re Next, Wingard and Barrett seemed to highlighting their love for “mysterious stranger” movies; ones where a random person shows up from out of nowhere, has an air of oddness about themselves, and also contain more than a few deep, dark, and dirty secrets that may, or may not make them a danger to whoever’s life they’re being thrown into. These are the kinds of movies that can go one way so cheaply and by-the-numbers, but with the Guest, Wingard and Barrett find a way to keep this tale moving, without ever seeming to focus on the constant cliches that usually make these kinds of stories such eye-rollers to sit through.

For instance, David Collins, the central character here, is an odd duckling, although he’s not really a cartoon. Sure, the guy gives off a strange vibe that makes you think he’s up to no good, but because Wingard and Barrett give him so many awesome scenes that high-light him as something of an endearing bad-ass, it’s hard for us to think of him as any bit of a baddie. There may be some underlining meaning behind the things that he does for this family, but whatever they may be, don’t matter because all we want to do is see him single-handedly get rid of all this family’s problems.

Dad may not be getting his promotion because of some young, hot-shot d-bag? Don’t worry about. Son continues to get picked-on by a bunch of the jocks at school? Once again, don’t worry about it. Daughter may have a boyfriend who is a bit of a shady character? Especially, don’t worry about. David Collins takes care of all these problems in his own manner, and while we want to think of all these scenes as obvious, Barrett and Wingard give them all a certain level of fun and electricity in the air that makes these tropes seem like something new, or better yet, cool.

And as David Collins, Dan Stevens gives off the perfect essence of cool, while by the same token, also has something weird and mysterious about him that we don’t know if we can fully trust. Being as how I’ve never watched a single episode of the Downton Abbey, I can’t really say I’ve ever seen much of a Stevens before, but now, that might change. The guy’s clearly handsome, but there’s something about that handsomeness that makes him almost deadly, which is why when the movie decides to have him turn the other cheek, it’s not only believable, but it allows for Stevens’ comedic-timing to really shine.

So conceited.

So conceited.

Although, the major problem I had with this movie mostly came from the fact that I couldn’t ever tell what this movie wanted to say about Collins, or how it wanted us to feel for him. First off, he’s obviously supposed to be the earnest problem-solver for this family, so of course we’re supposed to stand behind him and root him on. But then, the movie changes its mind about him and starts to throw in a convoluted back-story about his “time” in the army, which eventually brings in the government, SWAT Teams, and DEA agents out of nowhere. It’s crazy, sure, but it’s also fun to see, because you know Wingard and Barrett know better with this story then to allow for all of its wackiness to lead up to nothing.

Then again, though, it doesn’t seem like they want us to hate David Collins, either, even despite all of the evil, devil-ish acts he commits in the later-half. Maybe I’m looking a bit too deeply into this, but a part of me just wanted to know how I was supposed to feel about this guy and whether or not he’s the one I should rooting for. Clearly I wasn’t supposed to, but the movie had me fooled on maybe more than a few occasions and that was a tad disconcerting to me. Whereas with You’re Next, it was somewhat clear who we were supposed to stand behind, and who we were supposed to despise, but with the Guest, neither Wingard and/or Barrett can figure out who we’re supposed to love, and who we’re supposed to hate.

Anything in between is just strange. But maybe that’s just my problem and nobody else’s.

Consensus: Though it doesn’t quite reach the intelligent heights of You’re Next, the Guest is still fun, exciting, and a nice tribute to the kinds of movies that Wingard and Barrett grew up loving, and want to spin-around on their heads for the modern-day audience.

7.5 / 10 = Rental!!

The pose I always strike in the club. Without the fire-arm, however.

The pose I always strike in the club. Without the fire-arm, however.

Photo’s Credit to: Goggle Images

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11 responses to “The Guest (2014)

  1. Keith February 5, 2015 at 5:49 am

    Good review as always! This is a fun and entertaining flick despite its lapses into the absurd and downright dopey. Still I found myself glued to the TV all the way through.

  2. Zoë February 5, 2015 at 6:15 am

    Damn fine review Dan! I am a huge fan of this one, I definitely liked it far more than You’re Next. I loved how it was pulled together, and THANK YOU for the Dan Stevens pic because YUM. Other than that, I actually liked how you fluctuate between liking David and fearing David, never getting a real picture from him. I am glad to see you had fun with this one 🙂

  3. sidekickreviews February 5, 2015 at 7:09 am

    Good review! I actually enjoyed this one more than You’re Next. It’s loads of fun and Dan Stephens really kills it. 😀

  4. Brittani February 5, 2015 at 1:27 pm

    Nice review! I threw this in my Netflix queue awhile back after hearing decent things about it. I never did get around to seeing You’re Next.

  5. Three Rows Back February 5, 2015 at 6:31 pm

    Watching this at the weekend. Can’t wait!

  6. Jack Flacco February 6, 2015 at 3:47 am

    I’m looking forward to watching this. Your review sparked my interest!

  7. Tom February 6, 2015 at 7:13 am

    I thought this was way better than “You’re Next.” I think people are getting too hooked up on David Collins and his backstory. I personally took away from the movie that we still didn’t know who the heck this ‘protector’ really is. Yet he got to know everyone on such a disturbingly intimidate level. I really dug into that relationship. But maybe I took The Guest too seriously lol

  8. Lights Camera Reaction February 6, 2015 at 12:07 pm

    Aw, I’m going to have to disagree – sorry haha!
    I thought this film took itself a little too seriously instead of having more fun with it. Dan Stevens was too one-note for me and just looked constipated throughout.

  9. Tim The Film Guy February 8, 2015 at 12:58 pm

    This director is one to watch. Two for two is not a bad start 😀

  10. Paul. Writer. Filmmaker. Semi-Amateur Comedian. February 9, 2015 at 10:19 am

    Fine review. This – like You’re Next – is a great crazy little B-movie with a star-turn from Dan Stevens. It had an 80s parodic tone but was never corny. With filmmakers like Gareth Edwards getting mega-budget reboots such as GODZILLA (by mistake in my opinion), Adam Wingard must be close to getting a big Hollywood movie soon. Although I always prefer it when they stay within a budget as the restrictions create invention. I’m someone who prefers Peter Jackson’s early horror movies to his later blockbusters.

  11. Pingback: Commercial Break #18 | Mettel Ray

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