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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Far From Men (2015)


If budget-cuts weren’t enough, now teachers have to worry about transporting murderers.

Middle-aged schoolteacher Daru (Viggo Mortensen) leads a peaceful life 1950’s-Algeria. That all changes, however, when he is called upon to transport a prisoner by the name of Mohamed (Reda Kateb). Though Mohamed has been charged with killing his cousin, the reasons behind it make the crime seem justified in Daru’s eyes, so he tries to get him to escape to take them both out of trouble. The problem is that Mohamed doesn’t want to escape and instead, insists that Daru take him to the French, where he will either be imprisoned for the rest of his days, or killed instantly. Either option isn’t ideal, but then again, living in Algeria around this time period isn’t, so these two have to take whatever hand life deals them. Along the journey, the two get to learn more and more about one another, where they see that even though they are from two different societies, they are still alike in many ways; so much so that they eventually save each other from some very life-or-death situations.

I’ve said it before, and you know what? I’ll say it once again: Simple movies are sometime the best ones. While they don’t always need to challenge the viewer so much with numerous over-written, complicated, and contrived subplots, they also don’t need to forget to bring some complexity to their proceedings as well. In fact, there’s something of a line between being complicated and too much, against being too easy and skimping out on any details. Some may call me “stupid” for having such a love, or taste for movies that play it as simple and easy as most of life is, but so be it.

"Sadly, I did that."

“Sadly, I did that.”

And that’s one of the main reasons as to why Far From Men does it for me.

Granted, there’s a portion of this movie where I do wish that writer/director David Oelhoffen dug a tad bit deeper and tried to go for the heavy, complicated answers to even more complicated questions, but overall, there’s a lot here beneath the surface; sometimes, you just have to look closely enough to find it.

With this plot-line, too, there is some understanding that the audience watching will have to know an awful lot about the Algerian rebellion against the French, but honestly, one Goggle search will get you all caught up. Because, after awhile, it becomes clear that the movie is just using that setting as a backdrop for a story that, despite seeming like a rip-off of the same plot from the Last Detail, goes deeper to discuss what it takes to be a person who not only has faith and hope in one’s country, but in humanity as well. Some people believe that the two go hand-in-hand, but as this movie continues to go on and go on, the answer becomes very clear that that isn’t the case; sometimes, it’s much more complicated than that.

For instance, take the character of Mohamed – someone who would be so easy to classify as “bad” and almost “villainous”, because of what we are made to believe of him. Sure, he’s a murderer, but at the same time, the reason as to why he did kill somebody, and the fact that he isn’t trying to hide away from that fact, either, is quite telling. It’s obvious that most of this movie is going to concern itself with Daru and Mohamed talking to one another and bonding over whatever comes their way, but it’s less hokey and corny than you’d expect; rather than making things up and making it seem like these two are the same person, in and out, but separated by location, the movie actually embraces the fact that these are two different men. They may be sort of, kind of, maybe thrown into the same position against their will, with their hands literally and figuratively tied, but as is, they aren’t the same person, and because of this, it’s interesting to see how and where they bond.

Don't worry, he ain't so bad.

Don’t worry, he ain’t so bad.

With Mohamed, we learn that he’s more of a sympathetic character despite the fact that he killed someone; we realize that he’s a family man who, against his will, had to kill for his family’s freedom. But with Daru, we get a realy glimpse into the life and soul of a person who literally wants to do the right thing no matter what sort of situation he’s thrown into, but somehow, can’t seem to get past the fact that not everybody thinks or acts like he does. While he is in Algeria to teach young kids French and enlighten them in ways that they’ve never had the opportunity to be before, he’s also held down by the fact that he’s a former soldier who had to kill in order to survive. It’s also because of this, he is called on to act in his nation’s line of duty, whether he believes in the cause or not.

This character’s inner-fight is complex and believable, if not because of the way he’s written, but because of how great Mortensen is with him. It’s neat to see someone like Mortensen, an actor who seems so clearly comfortable with starring in big-budget, mainstream extravaganzas like the Lord of the Rings trilogy or Hidalgo, go for roles in much smaller, almost obscure movies that not even a quarter of the fans of those movies will see, but that’s why we have actors like him in the world. Mortensen, who is very good at speaking French mind you, gives Daru plenty to be compelling, but also shows that he isn’t a perfect human being and, for the most part, has to make some very desperate actions to keep himself, as well as Mohamed, alive and well, so that they continue on to their destination; wherever that may be. Don’t get me wrong, Daru isn’t happy about these decisions that he makes, but he feels like he has to and that’s already what makes him a challenging character to work with.

But then you remember he’s being played by Aragorn and all of a sudden, all negativity about that character goes away.

Consensus: While it may seem simple on the surface, Far From Men digs deep into these characters, as well as the terrain surrounding them, to create a fully-realized, understanding, and complex world where men are made to do whatever they possibly can to survive and continue on.

8 / 10

"No worries, I'm Viggo Mortensen and I've got a gun. Nothing can go wrong."

“No worries, I’m Viggo Mortensen and I’ve got a gun. Nothing can go wrong.”

Photo’s Credit to: IMDB, AceShowbiz

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One response to “Far From Men (2015)

  1. The Celtic Predator May 17, 2015 at 12:46 am

    I’ve been wanting to see this but haven’t found showtimes for it anywhere. How did you see this?

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