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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Tag Archives: 1992

One False Move (1992)

Small towns always need a little excitement.

Ray (Billy Bob Thornton), an immoral thief who always seems to question everyone and everything around him; Fantasia (Cynda Williams), Ray’s girlfriend who doesn’t always seem to take the violent way out, but more than often, doesn’t know what else to do; and Pluto (Michael Beach), an smart, yet, cold and calculated killer who isn’t afraid anyone, are all criminals who have been on the run for quite some time. Together, they’ve taken out friends of Fantasia’s, either to get money, drugs, or a whatever other valuables they can find, not only leaving a huge and disturbingly long trail of blood behind them, but making them public enemy number one, essentially. Eventually, the LAPD gets more and more involved, the more and more bodies start turning up, leaving them to trigger and target Fantasia herself. On the case are two detectives, Dud Cole (Jim Metzler) and John McFeely (Earl Billings), who both travel out into the middle of nowhere in Star City, Arkansas, because it’s where they believe Fantasia will bring her fellow criminals to. While there, they meet the eccentric and sometimes silly police chief Dale “Hurricane” Dixon (Bill Paxton), who has always dreamed of one day becoming a big city cop and seems to finally be getting the chance to do so. However, the case itself may be way too out of his league.

See what I mean?

One False Move starts off with perhaps the most disturbing first 15 minutes of as movie I have seen in quite some time. It’s a family, watching the home videos that they just filmed moments ago on their video-cameras, get a knock at the door, go to see who is at the knock, and slowly, but surely, each member of the family is either stabbed to death or killed, all while these tapes are playing the background. In fact, one person’s lifeless body lies right in front of the TV, while tapes of said person talking about how happy they are continue play. It’s harsh, brutal, unrelenting, and just downright mean, but it’s also the rare case of an indie-thriller really taking itself one step further to get down underneath our skin.

That said, it’s also the darkest and perhaps most ugly One False Move gets, which thankfully, doesn’t keep it away from being a solid flick in its own right. It’s just not nearly as upsetting.

Anyway, director Carl Franklin does a nice job here with the script from Billy Bob Thornton and Tom Epperson, by letting and allowing for everything to play out. Rather than trying too hard to focus on certain details of the story, the case, the murders, or even the characters, he sort of sits idly by and let them tell us themselves. And because of that, we get a lot of interesting material that we don’t often see in thrillers of this nature; we get an slew of interesting, three-dimensional characters, we get a plot that could literally go anywhere, at any time, we have a story that has, at the very least, more of a meaning than just “bad people deserved to be locked-up”, and oh yeah, bloody, surprising violence that matters more because, well, all of these things work and they matter.

It’s important to note what works here, because One False Move could have been a very easy movie to figure out, in terms of where it’s going, or what it’s going to be about. Had it been so easy, the movie would have just been another, typical action-thriller with plot twists and turns that don’t actually matter; instead, it’s a movie with some heart, emotion, crime, violence, and oh yeah, tension. It comes together mostly all perfectly well by the end, showing that in order for a crime-thriller such as this to work, all you really need is extra attention paid to the things that matter most.

“Stop thinking about the pony-tail, baby. It’s what’s in.”

Like, once again, characters, all of whom are played exceptionally well by all involved.

As the three criminals, Thornton, Beach and Williams all do good jobs in helping us get inside the mind of these sometimes cruel and unforgiving characters. While they’re never sympathetic or nice, they still at least show some colors you wouldn’t often get in a movie like this. Like, for instance, rather than seeming like a simple peon who is tired of the whole world stepping on him, is actually more of just a sissy who has a gun and some homicidal tendencies, which mostly has to do with the fact that he’s egged on by those around him. Beach is also impressive as Pluto, who is more detestable and downright evil, but shows signs of reasoning for it all. Meanwhile, Williams is effective as Fantasia, showing that there’s some sadness there, which makes her the most sympathetic out of the three, even if we’re never sure we can trust her.

However, the real standout of the movie has to be Bill Paxton, who on pure sheer charm and excitement, basically steals every scene he’s in. Sure, it helps that Paxton’s working with the most well-drawn character of the bunch, but Paxton shows some true heart, soul, and energy here and brings it to a movie that’s so drab and depressing at times, it’s a wonder if it knows what humor it is. Thankfully, it does and Paxton is the one to bring it, showing a real spirited soul within Dale Dixon and makes you not only see him as a good cop, but a good human being in general, who wants to make the world a better place, and intends to do so, all with a smile on his face and a beer in his hand.

Man, Bill. We miss you already.

Consensus: Dark, intense, and unpredictable, One False Move proves to be an effective thriller, but also gives us great performances and characters to help even things out, too.

8.5 / 10

Small-town cops get no respect.

Photos Courtesy of: AV Club, The Fanboy’s Perspective, Paperblog

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Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)

jonathan

Sell, or die.

Four salesmen get the wake-up call of their lives when corporate decides to wake them up with the highest seller in the company (Alec Baldwin), over to their dingy office to not just motivate them, but also warn them: If they do not sell the right amount real estate that’s necessary, well, then they’re fired. This shocks everyone to the core and leaves each salesman left to fend for themselves, by any means necessary. There’s George (Alan Arkin) and Dave (Ed Harris), two guys who seem to have each other’s backs, even in all of the thick of this; there’s Ricky Roma (Al Pacino), who can hang with the best of them and get any person to buy, just based solely on his charm alone; there’s old-timer Shelley “the Machine” (Jack Lemmon), who’s been in this business long enough to know just how to sell, but has been having a rough go as of late; and then, finally, there’s John (Kevin Spacey), who is, essentially, their boss, but is mostly there to just go back to corporate and tell them all what these guys are doing, who’s providing the best results, and most importantly, who gets to stay, and who gets to go.

I'd love to have a drink anywhere near these two. Seriously.

I’d love to have a drink anywhere near these two. Seriously.

Glengarry Glen Ross is great for many reasons, the main being David Mamet and his way with words. Sure, it’s no surprise to anyone who has ever seen a Mamet movie that the guy knows how to script smart, somewhat tough-guy dialogue for people you wouldn’t expect to saying it, but watching and especially, listening, to each and every person talk in Glengarry Glen Ross, is truly a joyful experience. It’s like listening to an old pro, just go on and on about his experiences and life lessons, without it ever seeming hacky, or annoying – you want to hear gramps go on and on, so long as there’s more coffee being provided.

In Glengarry Glen Ross, you don’t need the coffee. All you really need is the great ensemble assembled here, all of whom, honestly, are pretty great. And this deserves to be pointed out, too, because in a lot of Mamet’s movies, you can tell when there are those people who can do his dialogue justice, and others who just can’t seem to get it. Due to his dialogue being so mannered and stern, sure, some actors come off as if they’re trying too hard, or not getting the point, but when you have those actors who do know what they’re doing and know how to handle the material, then it’s an absolute delight to listen to.

Which is why, I reiterate again, there’s no bad performance to be found anywhere here.

Everyone’s perfect for their role and it’s the rare gamble wherein a bunch of big names took on Mamet’s material, and they were all pretty great, without a single weak one anywhere in sight. Al Pacino does a superb job as the slimy, but smarmy and charming Ricky Roma; Alan Arkin is interesting to watch as the sort of meek and mild salesman, who seems as if his fighting days are long over; Ed Harris plays a rather sensitive role as the one salesman who is trying his best to stay afloat, but also seems to realize that his career has gone down the crapper; Kevin Spacey is good in a rare against-type role as a rather cowardly boss who has to do a lot of heavy-lifting for his job, doesn’t like it, but hey, has to get paid somehow; and of course, yeah, Alec Baldwin’s cameo is pretty amazing and legendary, but there’s no reason to go on about it. You’ve seen it, you’ve loved it, and you’ve probably quoted it a hundred times before, so there’s no reason to beat that horse.

We got it. Sell.

We got it. Sell.

But really, the stand-out for me, and the one who should have gotten more attention, was Jack Lemmon and his performance as Shelley, or as some call him, “the Machine”. Later-day Lemmon wasn’t filled with all that many bright spots, where he saw himself in more old grandpa roles, rather than the kind that challenged him more and showed that even in his old age, he could still hang with the big boys. And in Glengarry Glen Ross, he got to show that; the character of “the Machine” is a rich one in the first place, but Lemmon dives deep into him, with all that he’s got. “The Machine” is a sad, unfortunate man who sees his life and his career slowly running away from him, but he doesn’t sit around, he doesn’t pout, and he doesn’t ask for any sympathy – he goes out there and tries to sell, dammit. Lemmon makes us see the unbearably sad limits this character will go to, not just to stay successful, but somewhat relevant, as if his name will forever be remembered in the world of salesman.

It’s sad to think that such a thing exists.

The only thing that keeps Glengarry Glen Ross away from being the perfect piece of film making that it sometimes flirts with the idea of being, is that it’s pacing is a bit off. Director James Foley does a nice job of giving us a dark, eerie and noir-ish tone to the whole movie, without ever taking his attention away from the actors and their craft, but sometimes, it feels like it’s less of a play, and more of just a bunch of conversations happening, that we get to hear somehow. Not much of a story and when they do try to give us something of that, it doesn’t quite register. All we want to do is hear and watch these guys try to sell real estate, as well as their lives.

Sometimes, that’s all we need to be happy in a world like this.

Consensus: With amazing performances all around and an absolutely biting script from Mamet, Glengarry Glen Ross works as one of the better stage-to-film adaptations that has some ripples, but overall, transitions quite well.

8.5 / 10

Oh and yeah, you need those things, too.

Oh and yeah, you need those things, too.

Photos Courtesy of: LIDA’S FILM BLOG

Basic Instinct (1992)

Eyes advert, fellas!

Homicide detective Nick Curran (Michael Douglas) is known for always solving his cases to the best of his ability and because of that, he not only has a good career, but a good life in general. However, it all changes one day when he begins to investigate the mysterious of a rock star and links up with the sexy, vivacious, and possibly dangerous Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone). Believe it or not, she’s actually a crime novelist who loves to write about all sorts of deadly, violent crimes, or better yet, like the ones that continue to pop-up around the same time the death of this rock star occurs. For Nick, however, he believes that no matter how beautiful Catherine is, he won’t let her get in the way of his investigation. But that becomes a whole lot harder when Catherine starts alluding to Nick’s lover (Jeanne Triplehorn) as having more of a criminal background than she may have let on, making Nick think long and hard about whether this case is worth it, or if he just wants to retire from the force now and possibly settle down.

Love at first fight. And other stuff.

Love at first fight. And other stuff.

Oh, and Sharon Stone flashes a bunch of dudes.

There’s certain moments in film history that will forever remain infamous and the aforementioned Sharon Stone scene is one of them. Does it matter that the rest of the movie is neither as shocking, crazy, unpredictable, or infamous as that one scene in particular? Not really, but it doesn’t keep Basic Instinct, a rather mediocre, if at times bland erotic-thriller, to continue to pop-up in discussions about sex, movies, the MPAA, and mainstream, big-budget movies as a whole.

Because, like I said, Basic Instinct is a fine movie – director Paul Verhoeven doesn’t have it in him to make a boring movie, by any stretch of the imagination – but it also seems like the kind of movie that wants so hard to be cool, sexy, seductive, and rad, that it also forgets about what makes most movies like that in the first place: Some semblance of entertainment. Verhoeven loves his movies to be trashy, dirty and sweaty, which is what we get a whole lot with Basic Instinct, but that doesn’t make it nearly as fun, or as exciting as it sounds; in a way, it can actually be kind of boring. In a way, it’s clear that Verhoeven wants to make a sort of homage to the film noir’s of the 1950’s or so, but obviously, with a far more modern-update.

If that was his intention, then yeah, he got it down well; he captures the look, the feel, and most of all, the performances, except with a whole lot more boobs, butt, blood, and ice-picks. But style-points in a movie like this can only go so far – after awhile, there needs to be a story, emotion, and most of all, action. And I don’t mean “action” in the literal sense, as much as I mean in the proverbial sense – people just standing around, staring into space and thinking long and hard about what they want to do next, unfortunately, just doesn’t cut it.

You can look, but you can't touch, boys.

You can look, but you can’t touch, boys.

A lot of that happens in Basic Instinct, too.

A part of me thinks it’s just Verhoeven’s obvious European influences coming out, but a part of me also thinks that it’s just him slowly realizing that there’s not much more to the movie than a bunch of hot, steamy sex. And like I said, the hot, steamy sex is done well, it’s just that everything else surrounding isn’t and more or less, feels as if it’s all just filler so that Verhoeven himself can get another sex scene going. It’s understandable why the movie was so shocking back in 1992, but nowadays, sex in movies is overplayed, no matter how explicit and it made me wish that a good chunk of this flick was actually dedicated to an actual, compelling plot, and less to how Sharon Stone’s boobs or butt looked while mounting Michael Douglas.

Then again, the two do mount each other nicely and it’s one of the stronger aspects of the movie. That Nick has a bit of a dark side to him and is drawn to Catherine’s even darker, possibly more sadistic ways, makes the movie all the more enjoyable to watch; we know that he’s going to eventually crack under the pressure and make sweet, sexy love to her like the Dickens, but when, where, how, and at what cost, makes it all the more intriguing to sit through. Together, the two are quite good; they play-off of one another well, with Stone’s over-the-top playfulness, going hand-in-hand with Douglas’ over-the-top seriousness. In a smaller movie, with less of media-attention and a different director, the two probably would have made a very interesting drama, where instead of focusing on how many times they bang, it’s more about how many times they actually do love one another, but of course, that’s all a fantasy.

Of course, what we have is a movie that allows them to put in some good work, even if the work itself isn’t all that there. Verhoeven does eventually have some fun in the final-act, once people start getting killed-off left and right, but by then, it’s a little too late. The movie’s a little over two hours, but honestly, feels a whole lot longer than that, and because of such, it’s a bit of an uneasy watch. Just when you think and expect for the movie to fully pick up the slack and get going somewhere, Verhoeven decides to slow things down and focus in on these characters and whatever garbage lines they have to deliver. Sometimes, that’s fun, as long as it stays trashy and fun.

But being just trashy and leaving it at that, I’m sorry, is not fun.

Consensus: Well-acted and directed with plenty of style, Basic Instinct also proves that all of the sex, violence and nudity in the world, can’t make-up for a weak story and script.

6 / 10

Yeah, it's that scene.

Yeah, it’s that scene.

Photos Courtesy of: The Iron Cupcake, Indiewire

Hero (1992)

HeroposterEveryone’s a little super. Just look closely and stop judging!

Bernie Laplante (Dustin Hoffman) is known as a cheap-skate, a swindler, and just all around rat, who can’t be trusted with anything, or anyone. However, he makes the first selfless gesture of his life when he helps save injured passengers from a roadside plane crash. Before he can get any sort of recognition or praise for this righteous act of heroism, he vanishes into thin air, feeling as if he’s got nothing else to offer. But Bernie is very wrong, because not only are people out there looking for him, but most of all, the one, the only reporter Gale Gayley (Geena Davis) is now interested in finding this mystery man who put his own life at risk. And in by doing so, she announces a $1 million prize for anyone who is willing and able to step forward. But when handsome vagrant John Bubber (Andy Garcia) takes credit, Bernie now feels like it’s time to speak up, even while all of the media is centered on this one story.

What? Would you not trust these two faces?

What? Would you not trust these two faces?

Hero is a sloppy film in that it balances out a lot of what it wants to say, do, and actually be, but still, it all comes together because, when you get right down to it, it’s an enjoyable movie, with some great performances to be found. Sometimes, that’s honestly all you need in a movie, no matter how messy, muggy, or dirty it may actually be.

Okay, maybe that’s not always the case, but you get my point, right?

Anyway, what Hero benefits from the most is a great cast on-deck who feel as if they are more than capable of taking on this material and giving it all that they’ve got, even if they do sometimes feel like they’re far much better than the material itself. Hoffman especially is great in the lead because while he’s definitely an unlikable and pathetic bum, who constantly steals and rips people off for his own self-gain, he’s still likable and fun to watch. This is the beauty of Hoffman – give him a gritty character, a bunch of unlikable traits, and still, watch him as he works wonders into making him the most lovable guy in the whole world. The script always wants to give you the sense that there’s good in this man, but Hoffman does away with them in smart moves; you almost get the sense that Hoffman would have preferred for this character to have been more detestable and mean, but unfortunately, the movie is too light and quick on its feet to really get down and deep into those dark waters.

If anything, it wants to play around, have some fun, make jokes, but also be “about something”, which is what kind of ruins it in the end.

Cause honestly, Hero is the kind of movie that, yes, on the surface, it’s about something, but for some reason, the direction from Stephen Frears doesn’t seem to show that. If anything, Frears seems more interested in having fun with this situation and watching it spiral more and more out of control; it’s like a Capra crowd-pleaser, but obviously, a lot more modern. However, that’s the central issue with Hero – it never fully feels like it’s as funny, or as light as it should be, nor does it feel like it ever gets as dark or serious as it should.

Yeah, take a shower, Dusty.

Yeah, take a shower, Dusty.

What Hero seems to be talking about here is how the media portrays certain people as being hero’s, for the sole sake of ratings and attention, even if, deep down inside, these people are evil and ugly human beings, really. There’s been plenty of movies made about this topic and honestly, given today’s world of media, you don’t even need movies to know this – just turn on the tube and you’ll see what picture the world paints of celebrities and athletes. That said, it is hard to get down on David Webb Peoples and his script for trying, because Hero is the rare big-budget movie, with A-list stars, that’s more than willing to ask the hard questions.

Sure, it may not give the answers it oh so desires, but sometimes, all you need is a little question to make it all matter most.

Anyway, Hero‘s messy, but it’s a fun and, at times, interesting mess. It is something of a redemption story that, because of Hoffman and his dedication to his craft, is a lot smarter and sweeter than it may have intended to be. Even all of the media stuff, as wild and hectic as it can sometimes get, still works because of Geena Davis, in full-on charm-mode, showing us a character who may be sad, deep down inside, but is still looking for that story of her lifetime to make her feel somewhat complete as much as she possibly can. The movie never gets as deep with her as I make it sound, but trust me, there’s something there, if you look close enough.

And yeah, even Andy Garcia is fine; while comedy has never been his strong suit, there’s something to this character that makes you hate him, but also like him as well. The movie is filled with characters like these and it’s actually quite refreshing to watch; we know we’re supposed to like them, but there’s still factors and ideas about them that make that much harder to be a reality. Why more and more movies can’t feature these kinds of attributes is beyond me, but hey, I’ll take what I can get.

Doesn’t matter the decade it comes from.

Consensus: Albeit messy, Hero still benefits from a great class, interesting ideas, and an entertaining approach to a premise that could have easily been boring, preachy and sad.

7 / 10

All of the men can't wait for Geena. No matter what the year.

All of the men can’t wait for Geena. No matter what the year.

Photos Courtesy of: Rob’s Movie Vault, Virtual History, Cineplex

Reservoir Dogs (1992)

Wait, what’s “Like a Virgin” actually about?

A group of small-time criminals gang together to perform, what appears to be, a pretty easy and simple jewel heist. However, the situation goes awry for many reasons, leaving the plan to go to crap, some men dead, and suspicions to rise through the roof. One of the main suspicions is that one of the guys involved with the crew, as well as with the heist, is a cop; while Mr. White (Harvey Keitel) disputes this fact, even he too is feeling a bit odd about what had just transpired and where to go from here. This is when the rest of the crew comes into the picture, where everybody’s getting over just what the hell had happened at the heist and who is to be blamed for it – some react more eccentrically than others, of course. Mr. Pink (Steve Buscemi) wants to get right down to the bottom of who caused this whole mess; Mr. Blonde (Michael Madsen) just wants to sit around and hurt people for the heck of it; “Nice Guy” Eddie (Chris Penn) wants to know who screwed-up his daddy’s plan; and while this is all happening, Mr. Orange (Tim Roth) is coming closer and closer to death, as each and every second goes by, what with his gunshot wound and all.

Who does Quentin like more?

Who does Quentin like more?

So yeah, Reservoir Dogs is the sole film that put Quentin Tarantino on the map and for that reason alone, it deserves to be preserved, praise and adored for many years to come. It’s not just that since this was his debut and all that makes it worth talking about 20+ years later, but the fact that it’s still a great movie that deserves to stand alongside the rest of his other creations he’s made in the years since – which is obviously saying a whole lot. But what always keeps me coming back to Reservoir Dogs is the fact that no matter how many times I see it, it never gets old, boring, or annoying.

In fact, it just gets better and better, as mostly everyone of Tarantino’s films do.

However, having now seen this for what appears to be the umpteenth time, I will say if there was one qualm I had with the movie, it’s that it seems like Mr. Orange’s backstory runs on too long. It’s fine to see where he came from and why he matters to the story, but the whole segment concerning him, the story he has to tell to get these violent heavies to like him, and the whole visualization of said story, just feels over-done. It’s like when people complain about Tarantino’s movies nowadays being “too excessive”, as well as “overly-stylized” (both are reservations I understand, but never actually said), I totally understand; it just adds more filler-time to a movie that, quite frankly, doesn’t need it.

Because, for as short as it runs (just under 100 minutes), Reservoir Dogs is a pretty spectacular movie. What Tarantino does best with just about everything he touches, is that he gives his characters their own distinct personalities that matter when you hear them talk to one another, how they relate, and just what it is that they do when handling a heavy situation such as this. Even from the very beginning in the diner, Tarantino lays out all of the cards of which person has what kind of personality, and why they’re worth paying attention to; obviously, once everything gets heated and tense, the movie starts to show more shades of these characters, but it’s always believable and fun, if only because Tarantino sets everything up so perfectly.

And yeah, playing these characters, each and every person is great, showing that they’re clearly capable of handling the “Tarantino speak“, which is probably why most of them have appeared in his films since this.

As an actor himself, Tarantino isn’t anything special, but he’s less in-your-face this time around, so it works when we see him just delivering dialogue that, yes, he wrote, but clearly seems to be fine with letting others deliver as well. Even though it’s not hard to imagine that practically every member of this cast had no idea what they were reading when they picked this script up, it still does not show a single bit, as each member seems ready-to-go and accepting of where this movie takes them. Which is saying something because, for those who have seen Reservoir Dogs, it goes into some pretty crazy and wild places – all of which work and are just as exciting as the last maneuver Tarantino made.

Behind the camera is fine too, Quentin.

Behind the camera is fine too, Quentin.

But plot mechanics aside, it’s always about the characterizations with Tarantino that works best and it shows especially so with Steve Buscemi’s Mr. Pink. Of course, it’s no surprise to anyone that Buscemi’s a great actor who can appear in anything and still work, but here, he gets a chance to really show his true colors as a character who, for the most part, seems to be the voice of reason. While everyone else is on one side of the room, screaming, yelling and emoting loud enough for aliens on Mars to hear, Mr. Pink is just wondering to himself how the hell he’s going to get out of this situation and who is to blame. In that aspect, Mr. Pink is probably the funniest character of the bunch, which isn’t because he says anything funny, really – it’s just because Buscemi is so great at this kind of high-strung, take-no-crap character, that it’s just a joy to watch.

This isn’t to take away from everyone else here, obviously, but yeah, Buscemi’s the one I continue to think about after seeing this.

Keitel’s White is the more seasoned pro of the cast and clearly seems to be the heart and soul of the story, even when you start to feel even worse for him as the situation continues to loosen-up and get more screwy; Michael Madsen has that cool charm about him that even despite the fact that he’s playing a total and complete psychopath, you still kind of like him; Roth does a lot of yelling and crying, but is good at it enough that, in a way, it’s more fun to listen to than actually poke fun at; Lawrence Tierney’s Joe is always grumpy, but it’s hard not to like; and Chris Penn, playing Joe’s son, makes you feel like he’s a lot more of an a-hole, just because, yeah, Penn’s playing him.

Gosh. Wish that guy was still around.

Consensus: Over twenty years later, Reservoir Dogs reminds us all that Tarantino can write wonderful characters, a punchy script, and keep the violent tension running throughout.

9 / 10

Every group of dudes think they look like this. They're never right.

Every group of dudes think they look like this. They’re never right.

Photo’s Credit to: IMDB, AceShowbiz

Sneakers (1992)

It’s like Hackers, but for the older dudes.

Martin Bishop (Robert Redford) is the head of a kick-ass security testings team that seems to do just about everything and anything right. They crack systems for companies that pay them to test their weaknesses, in hopes that they’ll never run into that problem when the real deal comes around to town. Everything seems to be going all perfect for Bishop and his crew, until some government officials get jealous of him and have a bone to pick, so they decide to blackmail him into stealing a highly valuable sort of black-box. What happens next is a crazy game of lies, deception, double-crosses, and most importantly, smiles. Smiles for everyone!

Everybody loves themselves a good spy movie. Better yet, they love themselves a spy movie with a whole lot of gadgets. The cool thing about these gadgets is seeing what it is that they can do: spy on you on when you think you’re alone; manipulate your voice even without you yourself speaking; and they can even change your whole identity and you would not know at all, until Customs had to take you aside for a “check-up”. Basically, these little gadgets are not things you want play around with, especially when you have somebody’s life in the palm of your hands, but there’s also something fun and exciting to all of that.

"I told you man. She really does eat out of that cup afterwards."

“I told you, man. She really does eat out of that cup after the other’s done.”

If you’re not on the receiving end of these gadgets, that is.

However, this movie knows the dangers of these little gadgets, but doesn’t let all of that get in the way of a fun time. The tone is a lot lighter than most “spy films” of the genre and in a way, it works. A lot of the humor here is surrounded by all of these guys being one, big motley crew of sorts that were just sprung together with barely any rhyme or reason – other than just the fact that they all know how to do some pretty smart stuff when it comes to being super, dee-duper smart spies. This was pretty cool to see as I never thought I’d ever get the chance to see Mister Tibbs and Dr. Detroit share the same screen, ever, but that’s the whole fun behind this film and what makes humorous.

The problem I ran into with this flick is that the plot is so damn thin that it barely interested me at all. I get that not all spy flicks like this are going to have original and breathtaking story-lines that change the game, but at least give me something more to work with here. All of the plot twists that occur within the last hour or so, are all terribly predictable and don’t add much to anything other than having some gullible people in the audience be totally shocked. I mean honestly people, do you really think the guy is going to give his prized possession up in a fair way by just simply handing it over to him? Give me a break!

Also, the plot seemed to really start-and-stop with itself like it had all of the time in the world to tell it’s predictable story. There were literally times when I started to doze off because nothing interesting at all was happening on-screen and that was a real bummer since I thought there was going to be a lot more heist-y stuff going on that would at least catch my attention. And even when they did come up and liven everything up for me, they were gone very soon and never really heard from again, only until the last hour. Could have been more wild, could have been more exciting, and could have been more energetic.

But I guess that’s why they had two old dudes in the lead for this flick.

Guess the one who does the soonest? (Hint: It's not the guy who was 65 at the time)

Guess the one who does the soonest? (Hint: It’s not the guy who was 65 at the time)

Speaking of those two old dudes, it’s great to see Robert Redford and Sidney Poitier, as well as the rest of the ensemble. Robert Redford seems like he still has that cool wit and charm to his whole act, even if he is a bit older; Sidney Poitier still has his act as the tough son-of-a-bitch when it comes to being in the police force, but he still has some great lines that had me howling just because it’s him saying them and you can hardly ever be bored with him; Dan Aykroyd was fine as a person called “Mother”, and he has some nice lines in here as well, which isn’t much of a surprise, because he’s Dan Aykroyd for lord’s sakes; Mary McDonnell was a little feisty fire cracker that doesn’t let this become a total sausage fest and brings out some great lines to go against everybody else’s; David Strathairn plays the main blind guy who has his time to shine, and it’s a very well-deserved scene because Strathairn is so good with what he does, but is so pushed to the back, it made me a bit upset; and then you got River Phoenix in one of his last roles ever. It’s not a big role for him, but it’s still a nice reminder as to why this kid had so much potential to be great in the first place.

The one who comes completely out of nowhere and steals this film for all of the wrong reasons is probably Ben Kingsley as Redford’s old friend, now-turned-enemy, Cosmo. Without me even knowing beforehand, I had no idea that Kingsley was even in this until I saw the opening credits flash his name and it kind of got me pumped up wondering when, or where he was going to show up and do his thing. When he finally does show up and do his said thing, it’s laughable because of how ridiculous he looks with his pony-tail, and how terrible the American accent he’s trying to pull off is. Really, he steals every scene he’s in because it’s so funny to just watch him struggle with this accent and make a character mean and detestable, when all he seemed like was one, big push-over that you could easily just beat the crap out of. It’s weird though, because ten years later, he would totally prove me, as well as I’m sure many others, wrong.

Maybe it was the British accent that made him do better in that one.

Consensus: Sneakers fancies itself a good time and with the twisty plot, fun spy gadgets, and charming ensemble, which makes it hard to not join in on the fun, even if the story itself may weave in and out of cohesiveness.

6.5 / 10 = Rental!!

Sorry. Not impressed.

Sorry. Not impressed, Gandhi.

Photo’s Credit to: Goggle Images

Patriot Games (1992)

Those crazy Irishmen. You take away their Guinness and bodies start flyin’.

While he’s on vacation, having a rumpus-good time with his fam-squad, Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) finds himself caught in the middle of an IRA attack in England, where he kills one person and subdues another (Sean Bean). Ryan used to be apart of the CIA, but is now spending his time to be with his family, teach military students about history, and just keep on living his life in the most relaxing way possible, and then all of this comes up to ruin everything that was so peaceful to begin with. Although he’s touted as a “hero” and a “savior” among the mass-media, some think otherwise. And by “some”, I mainly mean the one dude who got arrested, who wants to extract revenge on Ryan the most sinister way possible: By getting right to the man’s family. Ryan, as any man of the house would respond, doesn’t take so kindly to some crazy, vengeful Irishmen trying to stomp all over his family, so he goes back to the Agency and finds himself ready to hunt this man, and his accomplices down, in hopes that they’ll leave him and his family alone. Easier said, then done, I’m afraid to say, Jack. Easier said, then done.

The most interesting thing about most Tom Clancy film-adaptations is how little they focus on the new technology, and more on the characters that inhabit the story. It’s very interesting, although, very strange as well, considering most of Clancy’s focus more on the hi-rez technology of the agencies he’s writing about, rather than the actual agents themselves, who use the technology on a regular-basis. More or less, they’re just there as paint-thinner on the wall, meant to show you that there is substance to the story you’re reading, no matter how weightless it may be.

The owner of that car never washed it again after that. True fact.

The owner of that vehicle never washed it ever again after this. You can still practically see the cheeks.

That said, Clancy sure does love the character of Jack Ryan and come to think of it, so does Hollywood. Not only have they adapted the character of Jack Ryan numerous times for the big screen (five to be exact), but they’ve also never given up on the possibility that this character will eventually break it big with mainstream audiences, and become something of a more classier-version of someone like, say, Ethan Hunt or James Bond. Seems like a very hard obstacle for this character to hurdle over, but I think with the right time, right direction, and right leading star playing that role, then Jack Ryan may be the household name Hollywood has been wanting for the longest time since 1990.

Which is why even though it’s the only Jack Ryan adaptation out of the whole bunch to actually gets it own sequel, Patriot Games still feels like it’s trying a bit too hard to reach those same heights, even if the heights of Ethan Hunt weren’t found yet. Don’t get me wrong, this movie is fun, but it’s fun in the type of way that you only get with thrillers that take their time and focus on the smaller things in their plot, like clues, like hints, and hell, even like twists that come at you, and yet, still feel deserved. Rather than focusing on all of the blood, bullets, octane and expositions, director Philip Noyce keeps the movie’s tension focused in on the story, what could happen next, why and by whom will be affected. These are the types of thrillers that usually work wonders for me, and for the first half-hour or so, I was really on the edge of my seat, while still waiting in anticipation for the violence to really start coming out at me.

That’s why when the action did start coming out at me, in full-fledged form, I was a bit surprised how disappointed I was with it all. It didn’t disappointment in the way that it was light on all of the action I feel like the story needed to fully kick itself into high-gear; it was more that the non-stop, high-flying action made this whole movie feel somewhat disjointed when the rest of the movie before then is taken into consideration. So much time and focus is placed on the plot, and all of the little intricate details surrounding it, and then once that all goes out the window because some bullets go flying and machine guns start getting fired, it felt out-of-place, as if Noyce knew that he had Harrison Ford in the lead role, therefore, he needed somewhere to show him throwing people off of moving-objects. Which, all seriousness aside, is awesome because Ford’s the man and can make kicking anybody’s ass at his age seem believable, but after all of the slow pacing the movie went through, it seemed like a cheat at the end of it.

Guess what happens next to this character that Sean Bean is playing?

Guess what happens next to this character that Sean Bean is playing?

Then again, like I said, having Ford in this lead role is more than enough to compensate for the fact that this movie gets a little off its rocker by the end. Ford handles this role of Jack Ryan like a champ, giving us a mean bastard who knows when’s the right time to get vicious with somebody, how and for what reasons. He’s not the type of a-hole member of the CIA that we usually see in movies; in fact, he’s very different because of the fact that he actually left the agency to try and make something better for himself and his family. In that case, he’s your regular, loving father in America, just trying to do right and make everybody that surrounds him happy, even if that means killing some people in order to do so. Even then, you still feel like he could be your next neighbor; the type who holds a very deep and dark secret in his basement, somewhere underneath all the cardboard boxes used for moving.

And while Ford’s lighting up the screen, doing his “everyday man” act like no other, the supporting cast is doing a pretty fine job as well. Anne Archer shows, once again, why she’d be the coolest wife for any guy to get to go home to and continues to have dreamers like us just wishing, hoping and waiting for the day that someone like her walks on by; Samuel L. Jackson plays one of Ryan’s buddies, and gives us a rather nice, soft, sweet and cool role that’s even more enjoyable to watch now, considering this all came before the Sam Jackson we all know, and mostly, love in today’s world; Sean Beans plays the nutty Irishman out for revenge and goes a bit over-the-top, but then again, I feel like that’s what he was called on to do, so whatever; and James Earl Jones shows up as Ryan’s head-boss and scares the crap out of everybody around him, everytime he shows up. And that’s even before he starts opening his mouth!

Consensus: The last-act may get too action-y and crazy for what was before, a smarter, thoughtful thriller, but Patriot Games still proves to be a nice adaptation of the Jack Ryan character, mainly due to the fact that Harrison Ford can play a character like this in his sleep, without ever seeming like he is in fact sleeping.

7 / 10 = Rental!!

He'll take a bullet for his family anytime. Then again, if my wife was Anne Archer, you bet I sure as hell would too!

He’ll take a bullet for his family anytime. Then again, if my wife was Anne Archer, you bet I sure as hell would too!

Photo’s Credit to: IMDB

Dead Alive (1992)

Or Braindead. Whatever you want to call it, there’s still plenty of blood-flavored corn syrup to be found.

In 1950’s New Zealand, village nerd Lionel (Timothy Balme) tries to keep his romance with local bag-lady at the supermarket, Paquita (Diana Penalver), up and running. However, the only real factor getting in the way of that all is his constantly nagging mother (Elizabeth Moody), who never seems to want him to leave her alone, or stray away from her and fall in love with somebody else. It would be sort of sad and sweet in a way, but she’s such a beotch that Lionel can’t help but wish she was dead. Well, eventually, good ol’ Lionel gets his wish to come true when all of a sudden, his mum is bitten by a virus-infected Sumatran Rat Monkey. Slowly but surely, before Lionel knows it, his mom has dies but is still alive in the way that she’s a zombie, running around, biting, feeding off of and infecting others as she goes on her merry way. Eventually, she starts to infect too many people to where Lionel has to keep them all locked up in his basement so that the infection won’t spread and kill almost every person in town. But one night, against Lionel’s wishes, a party is thrown at his huge pad which leaves the basement unattended to at times, therefore, also leaving there plenty of time and space for these infested-zombies to start having themselves a little feeding time!

OOOOOH!!

OOOOOH!!

While it has been said many times before that Peter Jackson is definitely the only type of person that can direct the Lord of the Rings/Hobbit movies the way they need to be directed, I still wonder how that decision or that idea even, all came about in the first place. Most of the movies he made before the Tolkien adaptation, were just strange, slightly off-kilter horror movies (with the exception being Heavenly Creatures, which was somewhere in the middle) that didn’t tackle big spectacles of sword, sorcery and wizards. They were just odd movies, made from a pretty odd nerd who seemed to have a talent for making really crazy, but really fun horror movies, with this being the clear example of that statement.

Over the years, I’ve heard many people go on and on about this movie and I never gave it a shot because horror movies really aren’t my thing, nor is gore, which I heard this movie had a load of. But, much to my surprise, the movie still kicked my rear-end into high-gear because while it sure as hell was a horror flick, it wasn’t a very scary one, nor did it ever take itself too seriously. It’s a B-movie in every sense of the word and never stops being campy, over-the-top or just absolutely wacko with whatever it’s doing, and never for once settling for less. You rarely ever get that with B-movies nowadays to where you could get a movie that doesn’t take itself too seriously, yet doesn’t go to the full-max of its insane potential; but Jackson did not disappoint me here one bit. I mean lord, there’s even a scene where a dude beats the hell out of this zombie baby in a public park! If that doesn’t give you the idea of what to expect from this flick, then I have no clue what will! Anyway, I have to give Jackson loads of credit here because he kept everything quick, hilarious, crazy, unpredictable and best of all, campy, but done so in the right way.

Thanks, Pete. You da man!

And now, the gore. Yes, yes, yes. In case you haven’t been able to tell by now, or haven’t heard about this movie before, there is plenty of blood, gore and dismembered limbs to be found here and if that is not your thing, then get the ‘eff up out of here and go rent Steel Magnolias or something. But if those three elements all sound like a juicy good time to you, then you, my friend, should definitely get the hell out there, find your wallet, do whatever you have to do, and see this movie right away. Why? Because the insane amount of gore will utterly leave you flabbergasted, but don’t be alarmed, because it’s done in a sense that goes hand-in-hand with the rest of the directorial style.

Some moments in the flick, you’ll literally be laughing your arse off by how ridiculous everything is, and then the next second, you’ll be holding your stomach, just begging yourself not to barf all over the area in front of you. Case in point, try the dinner-table scene that occurs early on in the movie. Lionel’s mum is already infected, but she isn’t feeling the total side effects yet to the point of where she’s practically a walking corpse, but she’s sure as hell getting there. So, she spends this whole scene falling to itty, bitty pieces, while also somehow getting a small amount of her infected puss into some guy’s pudding. It’s literally the most disgusting thing you’ll see in the whole entire movie, and that’s really saying something. It’s one of the very rare times I’ve actually felt my insides curl up, but at the same time, still couldn’t keep myself from laughing to high heavens.

AAAH!!

AAAH!!

And that’s exactly what Jackson does here, and does well: He finds a balance. Many times throughout this flick, you can tell that Jackson wants to be goofy, and sometimes he wants to be serious. More times than not, he ends up coming off as just plain old cheesy, but that works well for the rest of the movie as it gives you the impression this guy knows what he’s doing the whole way through. Which is why once we get past all of the constant yammerings of the first-to-second acts, the movie kickstarts its heart, gives you all of the splattering gore, in-your-face and hilarious situations, right in front of your eyes. He also finds a way to continually find newer, cooler ways to show one of these zombies being hurt or killed, that keeps you on-edge the whole time, wondering just what Jackson is going to pull out of his pockets next. Usually, it’s something inventive that we’ve never seen done before, and even if we have, it still doesn’t matter because it’s a whole bunch of fun to see regardless.

That’s why, no matter what gripes I may have had with the meandering first and second-act of this movie, the way in which Jackson absolutely goes balls to the walls in the last act, more than made up for those problems and continued to put a smile on my face. Why Jackson doesn’t do more comedies like such as these, is totally beyond me. Bloody hell, he’ll do a melodrama about a teenage girl being raped and killed, and the investigation surrounding it, but he won’t return to his roots, if only for one movie or so? Bollocks I say! Bollocks!

Though none of them are big names in today’s day and age, the cast still do their jobs here, and they do them well. What I mean by that is all they are called on to do here is just be wacky, act as if they are constantly high at all times and be able to take a bunch of ketchup being thrown on their faces. All of them succeed at what they have to do, especially Timothy Balme who is constantly hamming it up the whole time, but still gives us a guy we can get behind to kill all of these zombies, even if he is practically the sole reason they’ve become such a large army. Even then, the dude still feels like he’d be willing to pull a chainsaw out at any moment, and I’m totally cool with that. Just keep it away from me.

Consensus: As ridiculous, as crazy and as over-the-top as you are possibly ever going to get with a B-movie, but Jackson’s non-stop stamps of creativity and total pleasure that obviously went into Dead Alive, make it a fun time, if you’re not squeamish. If you are, then stay far, far away from this one, ya hear?

8.5 / 10 = Matinee!!

WTF?!?!?

WTF?!?!?

Photo’s Credit to: IMDBColliderJoblo

El Mariachi (1992)

Money doesn’t matter, just be weird. When you do that, you’ll always be a winner, as well as crazy Quentin’s bestie.

A wandering mariachi (Carlos Gallardo) walks into a small Mexican town searching for any piece of work he can find. He walks around from drink-hole to drink-hole, and finds himself getting denied, time and time again. However, he also finds himself on-the-run when a bunch of gangsters mistaken him for another man, dressed in all black, walking around with a guitar case; except that dude’s guitar case is filled with all sorts of nifty little toys like guns, knives, and explosives. The poor mariachi just has his guitar in his case, the way it should be. So, for the next 90 minutes, the mariachi runs all over town trying to hide away from these gangsters hoping to make it out alive, and most of all, hoping to end up with the girl (Consuelo Gomez) he falls head-over-heels for completely out of nowhere. But when you throw love around in the midst of violence, the results don’t always come out so pretty.

The countless stories and legends behind the creation of El Mariachi is what makes it so damn unique in the first place. To think that a movie, let alone an action-thriller, could be made for $7,000 is ridiculous, but somehow, Robert Rodriguez made it happen. However, it wasn’t the average, conventional way of saving up money by finding investors, “borrowing” money from mommy and daddy, or going around from festival-to-festival in hopes of finding people that will find your product so worth their while, that they just have to put their money into it. Nope, instead, with Robert Rodriguez being Robert Rodriguez, saved up all of his money by being a human lab-rat for all sorts of medical tests and experiments that he found in the Classified Ads page in his local newspapers. Crazy, I know, but hey, at least it allowed him to save up just enough money to make his own movie. If that isn’t thinking outside the box, then I surely don’t know what the hell is!

Block out at least one letter of a major corporation to avoid copyright lawsuits.-Rule #204 to making a low-budget movie.

“Block out at least one letter of a major corporation to avoid copyright lawsuits.” – Rule #204 to making a low-budget movie.

Now, whether or not you knew about all of that beforehand, it doesn’t matter. Because, what does matter, is that the film got made, found an audience, and was bought for over $1 million dollars, making Rodriguez a household name, and also hero to all of us aspiring filmmakers out there. Even for a guy like me who promises himself day in and day out, that he’ll one day make a film before he turns 30, and most likely for anybody else out there who shares the same hopes and dreams as well.

And with that idea in your mind, the movie works on a whole different level. Whenever you’re watching a single frame in this flick, you’re just automatically thinking about, “How the hell did he do with that with such a small-budget?”, or even like, “I know how he did that. Gosh, it’s gotta be so easy to make a movie!!”. The whole movie plays out like this because you can tell that Rodriguez really put his heart, mind, body, and soul (literally) into this movie. He wanted to make the movie, he wanted to show the world what he could offer, and he did it all with what little resources he had, or in some cases, didn’t have. With that idea in your mind, the movie works as a piece of inspiration to all film makers and shows you that yes, even you, the poor film graduate who owes more than $15,000 to anybody you’ve ever shook hands with over the years, can make a movie with whatever you have in your pockets.

But inspiration can only go so far, and you have to look at the movie the way it is now, in the year 2013, and I have to say: It doesn’t hold-up quite as well.

"Better be the Fender Stratocaster I ordered."

“Better be the Fender Stratocaster I ordered.”

I get it though, Rodriguez obviously didn’t have a lot of money to work with here so he did whatever he could, however he could, with whatever he could, but a cheap movie can only entertain somebody for so long, that is until they start to see the cracks and strings show. What I mean by that is that the movie definitely has this over-the-top, over-zealous feel to it. It definitely doesn’t take itself too seriously, has a bit of a fun, and doesn’t let you forget that you’re watching the work of somebody who made something with such little resources. I was fine with that because it made me feel like, hell, I could have even made the movie had I lived in Mexico and been able to stand all of that heat and sweat. But, once the movie starts to get serious and pay more attention to its plot, then it sort of gets tone-deaf, as if Rodriguez paid a little bit too much attention to what he was TRYING to do, and didn’t realize what he COULD do, if that makes any sense.

By the end of the movie, this is fairly evident. Once you start to see that the plot’s tension has picked-up and the emotions are supposed to be running wild, you realize that Rodriguez loses a bit of his funny, wacky edge that he worked so well with in the first hour or so. That’s what the kept the movie alive because it was knowing, while also inventive in its own weird way. That’s why when it gets serious, the energy and creativity the movie kept on continuing to show us and have us feel, gets sucked-out dry and leaves us cold. Obviously we all knew that Rodriguez would make a revamped, bigger-budget version of this story no less than 3 years later, but back then in ’92, I bet if you didn’t know that valuable piece of information, the movie probably would have been just a worth while attempt at a movie that tried to defy all the odds, but instead, ended up becoming its own worst enemy. Can’t say I hated the movie for that, but it definitely left me with a sour taste in my mouth, although I definitely still had that urge to want to make my own movies. That’s why the movie worked the most, if for nothing else.

Consensus: The legend behind the making of El Mariachi is probably what makes it so interesting and inspiring to most people out there, especially the aspiring film makers who are looking for that big-break quite like Robert Rodriguez was at the time. But however, the legacy it holds behind, doesn’t quite do the movie itself enough justice to really make you want to watch it again, and again, and again.

7 / 10 = Rental!!

A mariachi and his guitar. Aka, LOSER.

A mariachi and his guitar. Aka, DWEEB.

Photo’s Credit to: IMDBCollider

Halloween Horror Movie Month: Army of Darkness (1992)

It’s official, Martin Lawrence totally tried to copy The Bruce Campbell. Obviously, it didn’t work.

This begins where Evil Dead II left off, except once again retconning the fact that Ash killed the flying bird thing at the beginning. Instead, he is taken prisoner by English knights at war with a group of Scots. After Ash shows his skill and superiority when killing the “Deadite” used for executions, the film takes a very adventures turn. Ash tries to fling the Necronomicon, mistakenly chants the phrase wrong, and is soon against an army of the undead.

It’s sort of weird that I placed this in the Halloween Horror Movie Month-meme because this one really isn’t as much of a horror flick as much as it’s more of a comedy. However, it is part of the Evil Dead franchise, so I guess it belongs here in that sense and it also makes me feel great knowing that I have finally got done watching it all. And jeez, what a franchise, man.

Since this was made after Sam Raimi hit it pretty big with Darkman two years before, the budget here’s definitely a lot bigger than what he was used to working with, which basically meant he was able to do whatever the hell he wanted, how he wanted, and with as much moolah as he wanted. That’s a pretty smart-idea to pull-off because if you give Raimi enough money, he’ll definitely be able to make it work and that’s what he shows off here.

There’s a lot of fun to be had here with this movie: the comedy is more obvious now but still goofy and over-the-top, the monsters are a lot better-looking, but still odd; and the action is very polished, but still entertaining as hell to watch on-screen. It’s obvious that this movie is very different from the other ones because of what it has at it’s disposal, but that doesn’t really seem to get in the way of Raimi and what he wants to do with this movie, and that’s to pretty much just give us another wacky and wild ride, but this go-around, is placed in the middle ages, where there seems to be a lot more goofy crap happening.

Since this is a pretty up-front comedy, I think it’s pretty safe to say that on that level, it definitely works. Just watching Ash go around and say dumb shit to these characters, without them having a single-clue as to what he means is really, really funny. There’s a whole bunch of anachronistic humor here, but it never seems over-used and just continued to make me laugh and laugh a lot more. I mean, hey, the sight of a 1982 station-wagon standing side-by-side a knight and his horse is pretty damn funny once you take into a consideration the fact that none of these characters have any idea just what the hell that actually is. As I said before, not as much of a scary movie as it is funny, and that’s the real charm behind it all, is that it is funny and knows how to play around with itself.

However, when you look at it as a movie that came after the first two, it sort of pales in-comparison. Granted, this movie is still a strong add into the trilogy, but definitely seems a lot more careful with itself now, considering that there was more of an opportunity to be a mainstream hit, when we all know that Evil Dead is not for a large audience, because some love it and some get it. One of the biggest disappointments of this whole movie is the fact that there definitely doesn’t seem to be as much gore or blood this time around and a lot of the action and violence is shown, but never shown in an over-the-top way that made the first two so much fun. Actually, for a movie that’s rated-R, it’s a bit tame and seems like Raimi wasn’t allowed to do everything that he wanted, simply because of the big, studio-heads that were probably behind this movie.

It’s not that the love or the spirit isn’t here, because it definitely is, it just feels as if it could have been more of a successful stand-alone movie, rather than one that’s associated with the Evil Dead franchise because Ash is in it. But you know what? Ash is also probably the best thing about this movie and it’s all because of how freakin’ cool and king-like Bruce Campbell is, once again too, may I add. Even though it seems like a bit of a shaky-idea to have Ash out of the cabin, fighting demons and have him now in the middle ages, still fighting demons, it still provides a lot of opportunity for Campbell to really stretch out his comedic skills and show everybody what he’s got and needles to say, the results are far from disappointing.

It helps that the script he’s working off of is pretty solid, but Campbell still adds a lot of that goofy, campy charm to a movie that seemed like it really needed that to remind us of the old movies. A shitty line like “Give me some sugar, baby”, just wouldn’t sound right if it was placed in any other movie, with any other actor saying the line, but thankfully, this is an Evil Dead movie and it is Bruce Campbell who delivers that line. Seriously, if a lot of you out there don’t like the first two or don’t even understand the real charm and awesomeness of Campbell, then I urge you to see this movie and watch it for his performance alone. There’s just something about him and his comedic-timing that just puts him and Ash one step ahead of everybody else in this flick and it’s definitely one of the best elements of the whole movie. Guy had me howling from start-to-finish, but he still kicked-ass when the movie needed him to and you know, that’s all that really mattered to me.

Consensus: Army of Darkness is definitely the weakest entry of the whole Evil Dead franchise, but is still a fun movie in it’s own right mainly because of the charm and likability of it’s leading man: the man, the myth, the mother ‘effin legend, Mr. Bruce Campbell, everybody.

8/10=Matinee!!

The Crying Game (1992)

The twist heard all over the world. And then was kind of forgotten about.

To free their jailed comrade, Irish Republican Army terrorists Fergus (Stephen Rea) and Jude (Miranda Richardson) abduct British soldier Jody (Forest Whitaker), hoping to make a swap. Fergus and Jody bond, and, sensing death in the offing, the prisoner asks his captor to look up Dil (Jaye Davidson), Jody’s London paramour. When the IRA’s plan backfires, Fergus takes flight, locates Dil, falls into a romance and … gets the shock of his life.

Back in 1992, this film was making head-lines for a certain twist that had people all over the world going bonkers. No, I will not tell you the twist but if you know it already going in like I did, you will still like this film.

Writer and director Neil Jordan does a great job with the film here because it starts off very bleak with a kidnapping and being all confined to this green-house, but then we are taken to the streets of London and everything changes, but yet there is still that bleakness in the air. A lot of this film is focused on the story and characters being developed while not forgetting to actually keep a certain sense of suspense here and there.

Another thing about Jordan and what he does here, is that he actually combines all of these different types of genres, with some twists and turns while still staying on track and giving us some much-needed themes and messages about sex, gender, and race. There is a lot of dark things here but Jordan somehow just knows the right way to keep this material compassionate for the characters that inhabit this story, and how each and everyone of us have a mask, and when we take it off, the real person comes out. Whether that person being nice or bad, it’s what we are as humans.

The problem with this film as it goes along, I felt myself sort of falling more and more out of the story because what started off really engaging, turns into something interesting, then just turns into a predictable and cliche-ridden thriller that comes out every Friday at the movies. It sort of disappointed me because I was really starting to get involved with this story but then I guess I just saw where it was all going, and then my interest was sort of lost, even if it was sort of still there.

Stephen Rea is very good as Fergus, a guy who I did not imagine being as compassionate and easy to like as I imagined, but somehow Rea plays almost every emotion Fergus has, to his core. Rea practically plays the same guy he plays in every film now, but that’s not really a bad thing since he is so good at doing it. Jaye Davidson is very good as Dil, and without giving too much away, plays this character that we don’t want to believe, but just somehow really stand behind and enjoy every time she’s on screen. It’s a shame that this person doesn’t do much anymore, because this performance shows a really bright career. Forest Whitaker may be considered one of the leads in this film even though he’s not in it for too long, but every scene he has is so perfect and just made me realize that he had Oscar written all over him back in 1992.

As for our little twist, it’s pretty shocking, but that’s if you don’t know what’s going to happen. I knew it from the beginning because everybody told me, but to be brutally honest, if I didn’t know already, I would have been able to tell right away. It’s pretty obvious but back in a time where this twist was completley daring, I could see why so many people would freak over it. If you know it don’t tell your friends, but just be expecting a shocker….kind of.

Consensus: What starts really strong, soon turns into pretty predictable and cheesy, but with a dark direction, great writing, and a pair of powerful performances, The Crying Game works about 1 hour and 25 minutes in, but then just falls. Also, be ready for a shocker, even though many of you actually reading this already probably know what it is.

7/10=Rental!!

A Few Good Men (1992)

A movie that is always remembered for that one famous line.

When cocky military lawyer Lt. Daniel Kaffee (Tom Cruise) and his co-counsel, Lt. Cmdr. JoAnne Galloway (Demi Moore), are assigned to a murder case, they uncover a hazing ritual that could implicate high-ranking officials such as shady Col. Nathan Jessep (Jack Nicholson).

When it comes down to it, this a powerhouse of a film. The writing, acting, plot, and directing has got it all, and let’s just say even after 18 years, it stills stands the test of time.

My main love of this movie comes from it’s incredible writing job from the always brilliant, Aaron Sorkin. There is a lot of detail that goes into this story, and not for a second do you get confused by what’s going on, and what is to come. There is plenty of hard talk going throughout this film, and that’s what kept me watching, is how I was just compelled by everything that was said, and happened in this film. The main reason it’s so compelling is because you see just how people act in a certain way, especially when it comes to making decisions that have major consequences.

The problem is that the film is quite a predictable, and run-of-the-mill courtroom drama, with a bit more than others. It plays off as a conventional story, and although it’s interesting, as you keep on watching, you can’t help but think, you have seen this before.

However, the acting here is just superb, with almost every star, basically having their work cut out for them. Tom Cruise, plays his usual cocky character, but with a lot more of a likability this time, and you don’t hate him as much, you start to cheer him on. Demi Moore, and Kevin Pollak, are both Cruise’s little helpers, and do well, creating tow characters that we enjoy watching especially on the screen with Cruise. Although it may seem more like an extended cameo, Jack Nicholson’s part is honestly one of his most well-acted. He starts off as a total dick, and every time he’s on screen you can just feel the tension, and the anger from this dude, and your just getting chills with every little thing he says. However, by the end, and mainly because of that explosive ending, you realize that there’s so much more to his character, and although you may not agree with his claims,you still understand. Those last 20 minutes between Cruise and Nicholson, are just so perfectly acted, and works so well with this whole movie, and when it’s all over, your just amazed at what you just saw. There are of course other supporting acts that are notable such as Kiefer Sutherland, Kevin Bacon, and the always reliable J.T. Walsh. All of the stars in this movie, each give their 100% efforts, and you can tell, which makes this film even better.

Probably the other great thing about this movie is that it can also be used as a great moral tale, or discussion. The whole movie you think got everything figured out, until those last 20 minutes come up, and you just don’t know what to think about it all. I have seen this about 3 times, and let me just say I still don’t know what was right, and what was wrong, but that’s the best thing about this film.

Consensus: A Few Good Men may be your conventional story, it all gets over-shadowed by it’s great script, powerful acting from the whole cast, and those last 20 minutes that will just take you back so much.

8.5/10=Matinee!!!

Husbands and Wives (1992)

Breaking up with a person really does take a lot of energy.

Director Woody Allen stars with Mia Farrow in his comedy as a long-married New York couple whose own relationship starts to crumble when their best friends (Sydney Pollack and Judy Davis) announce they’re separating. Smoldering resentments and unexpected jealousies soon rise to the surface, erupting in savage humor and hilariously unpredictable reunions.

When it comes to showing human emotions, basically about anything, Woody Allen is always known for showing it in its best, and brutally honest way. Although he is a huge dirt, I still love his work and can consider this a good one as well.

The one thing about this film that you have to know is that it’s incredibly honest about how relationships really are. We leave them sometimes, and were not exactly sure, until we start to think about it over ourselves and know we made a mistake. Allen brings that up countless times, showing these 4 characters trying to find anyway of expression of love, so they can be happy, as well as their partner. As usual with Allen, there is plenty of dry humor in this, but it’s also very dark. These people are constantly bickering, fighting, betraying, and hurting one another, all over love, and it’s kind of in a way it’s very mean spirited, but we don’t get that because of Allen’s tone.

I did have a couple of problems with this film that kind of did take the effect of this film down for me. I never understood why they were doing a random documentary feel to the film. It was kind of stupid and didn’t really allow many things to happen on its own, it was just telling us. Also, the little sub-plot between Allen and Juliette Lewis starts off good, but after awhile things just start to get dumb, because I knew what was going to happen between these two, everybody else watching this movie did too, his character was the only one who didn’t know, or even think about it, which was pretty stupid.

Woody Allen is as usual good here, playing Woody Allen nothing else. Mia Farrow is also sweet, but good ehre as well, and this was their last film together until the shit hit the fan with Allen and “his adopted daughter” Soon Yi Previn. It’s weird watching this film, cause the whole time it just feels like fore-shadowing between these two. The two best in the cast without a doubt is Sydney Pollack and Judy Davis who just eat up the screen every time their on it. You can see the emotions they feel, through their speech, and through they way they act, which is something great, cause they use their comedic timing to connect with the audience and make their characters all the more realistic. Liam Neeson is in this two before he became a big star, and does pretty good with the material, giving a lot more to his character than we were expecting.

Consensus: It may not be the best thing Allen has ever done, but it is cleverly written, with enough comedy, and dark drama, to keep you watching, as well with the perfect performances backing it all up.

7/10=Rental!!

Forever Young (1992)

Yes, it’s a Mel Gibson, everybody hates him basically.

In 1939, the love of Daniel’s (Mel Gibson) life, Helen (Isabel Glasser), falls comatose after an accident. Grief-stricken, he agrees to be frozen alive in scientist Harry’s (George Wendt) cryogenics experiment in the hopes that when he’s thawed, Helen will be recovered. Some 50 years later, two kids revive Daniel, leaving him to cope with society’s developments — and having to find Harry and Helen.

This is one of those films that has a pretty interesting plot, but for some reason it just comes out really dumb on film, and no questions are answered. The plot makes no sense at first now that I look at it, his girlfriend gets in a car accident, and he doesn’t want to deal with the guilt, so he freezes himself for 50 years hoping that she’s still alive by then. Why wouldn’t you just wait?? Like that is the dumbest thing I have ever heard.

Also, the way this guy tracks everything down is dumb, cause he doesn’t even look for these people he once knew, and he’s all upset that some of his old friends are dead, when why wouldn’t they be?? It’s freaking been 50 years, and you think that everybody would just be alive as soon as you woke up!??!

This film was basically used as a star vehicle for Mel Gibson and well he’s good here. His character may not be the nicest guy ever, but he’s at least likable and nice to watch. But Jamie Lee Curtis is in this film, and her talents are showered down by a terrible character, because her and Gibson start to fall in love (who would have ever guessed), but they don’t pounce on it because Gibson is still looking for his lost love. So then Curtis is just there to stand and look pretty as usual.

The film does have its heart in the right place, and for some you may actually enjoy it, but I just couldn’t get past the story at all, and that’s what really fails.

Consensus: Forever Young may have a good Mel Gibson performance, and enjoyable for some, but it’s story is too unbelievable, dumb, and not as smart as it may look on paper.

2/10=SomeOleBullShitt!!!

Singles (1992)

Seattle Grunge may not be the most romantic music out there, but for these people, it’s the closest thing their going to get to Marvin Gaye.

A group of twenty-something friends (Matt Dillon, Kyra Sedgwick, Bridget Fonda, and Campbell Scot), most of whom live in the same apartment complex, search for love and success in grunge-era Seattle.

Writer/Director Cameron Crowe is a very smart person. His two films Jerry Maguire, and Say Anything.., are perfect examples of films that blend smart comedy, with realistic romance. With this one, he does an OK job to say the least.

The one thing Crowe does with this film is that he shows these real people talking about real stuff, and expressing their real feelings. You get a real sense of how love is, and sometimes not supposed to be. Crowe plays out some little director tricks to give us the feeling of how it feels to be in love, and how we all react to when we are in love. There’s also a lot of Generation X nostalgia that will tell you how these people feel about the future, and what they expect from it.

Although, I think Crowe didn’t know what to do when it came to comedy. Yeah, there’s a little laugh here and there, but it’s all too random. There are just moments where something weird happens, and yeah, it turns out funny, but it’s so useless.

Also, the soundtrack is pretty rockin’, with grunge greats like Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, and Alice in Chains, but the music never plays a huge part in this film which kind of bums me out. I wanted to hear more insight on how this dirty, and dark music, made these people feel, and how they connected to it.

The performances from the cast we’re very good. Bridget Fonda is good, as this cute, likable girl that falls for the heavy grunge rocker, Cliff, played by the always amusing Matt Dillon. He’s as usual funny, but he’s also kind of a dick, but its not off-putting, he knows that he is. Campbell Scott and Kyra Sedgwick do the best jobs together in this film. They are both aimlessly in love, but they don’t know how to approach it, nor do they know how to express, cause they have recently been hurt. It’s great to see these two on-screen together, and it all feels so real. We also get great cameos from Paul Giamatti, Jeremy Piven, Bill Pullman, and the most random one yet, Tim Burton. Yeah, the director dude is in this, and I have no idea why.

The only problem with a lot of these characters is that it never gets fully in-depth to who these people really are. Yeah, we get to hear about their past love-life, but we walk into their lives with an open-mind, but get nothing in return. We guess their all good, and nice people, they just all need love. I guess…..

Consensus: Aimless, and not enough depth, stops Singles from being a great romantic comedy, but it has good performances, and a very smart script that shows real people, talking about real feelings.

7/10=Rental!!

White Men Can’t Jump (1992)

This title is so false! They have obviously not seen me hoop it up on the courts.

Pretending to be a goofy white guy with no skills, Billy Hoyle (Woody Harrelson) earns his keep by hustling pickup basketball games in Los Angeles. But when one of Billy’s victims (Wesley Snipes) subsequently becomes his partner, the pair gets a taste of real success. They must also contend with some shifty characters — and their own competitiveness

A good sports comedy in today’s world is hard to come by, especially in today’s world. But when used right, it brings comedy lovers, and sports lovers together.

The best thing about this movie is that it comedy almost never seems to get taken out of proportion. A lot of the stuff they say in here is straight up laugh-out-load funny, but it never becomes one of those huge joke fests that you can’t take seriously. However, I will say some of the best yo-momma jokes come from here, ones that I have never heard, and will use soon on some sucker who’s trying to diss me and my game.

There is also a lot in this film that is real. The film shows these two guys’ lives, and how their own wives live with the fact that their two men, are just boyish characters. The film shows how if you make one decision on, or off the court, you never know what the out-come may be, whether it be good or bad. I had a problem with the film by the middle act, where it seems to get stale. The jokes are flying everywhere but they don’t seem to stick quite as well as the first act. Also, the little sub-plot with the gangsters trying to find down Harrelson and take over his debt, was kind of dumb, but hey it didn’t totally ruin the movie.

If your a huge b-ball fan, like me, your going to love the basketball playing sequences themselves. There shot in a nice style, with just the right type of music, to bring out the energy a lot in a film, that strives so well for it.

The trio of leads is what makes this film its best. Wesley Snipes is at his funniest, as big-time street baller Sidney Deane. he brings out all the charisma he has in his character, and it works in his advantage cause we actually end up liking him a lot more than you expect. Woody Harrelson’s character, Billy Hoyle, starts off as likable and smart, but then he kind of turns into a dick head, and you start to kind of dislike him, mostly cause you don’t know his intentions. But besides that he still gives a funny performance here. Rosie Perez almost steals every single scene she’s in, cause that high-pitched voice just works so well with this material, and really does have you laughing, even when the film is semi-serious. She played the same character in Do The Right Thing and every other movie after, but hey it always seems to work. The genuine chemistry between Snipes and Harrelson is what makes the film click, but also the message that the film brings up. Whites and Blacks, may never get along when it comes to the sport of basketball, and that is not racist, it’s just the truth on how both sides see the game differently.

Consensus: The plot may meander, however, White Men Can’t Jump is a great blend of fun, sports, and comedy, lead by a great trio of leads.

8/10=Matinee!!!

Mr. Saturday Night (1992)

Made me think that Billy Crystal is actually hilarious.

Actor-director Billy Crystal gives a searing portrayal of fictional comic Buddy Young Jr., a classic borscht belt stand-up comedian whose skills can’t sustain a career undermined by his acidic self-loathing. A character study with bite, Mr. Saturday Night features the underrated David Paymer as Buddy’s loyal, long-suffering brother and Helen Hunt as the new agent reluctantly assigned to Buddy.

This is Crystal’s directorial debut and it kind of suits him very well. He, himself is a comedian, that also went through the same things his own character has gone through as well.

The film is directed with a lot of sure inspiration. Crystal weighs out the film between truly hilarious moments, and than some actually nice touching dramatic scenes. Many people upon first view will think its a gut-busting comedy, instead its more of a character study of how much fame can actually make you go over your head.

The one major flaw with this film is its main character, and mostly the writing. Crystal does some of the writing in this film and you can tell when he’s ad-libbing, but the problem was that his character was too off-the-walls. We didn’t know on whether to love this guy cause of his huge sense of character, or hate him cause of all the mean and cruel things he says to other people in such a demeaning way. Also, the film doesn’t prove any insight to his wife’s own character. Throughout the whole movie she is basically a one-note character, cause the only scenes she does stuff in is when she is saying she loves him. When in reality we have no idea of why this chick loved and has loved him for so long.

Crystal does give a wonderful performance here as Young Jr., and matches a lot of his hilarious stand-up comedy, as well as his emotional scenes. I feel like Crystal, the actor, is too likable as a whole and is hard at trying to convince us he can be such a deauche bag. David Paymer is very good here as his brother who never loses the screen when he and Crystal are on, he provides more of three-dimensional character than you would expect.

Consensus: Crystal’s directorial debut is impressive, with nice touches of comedy and drama and good performances, but its writing isn’t as up to date, especially with its characters.

8/10=Matinee!!!!

Scent of a Woman (1992)

Who ever knew blind people, were so different!

Hoping to earn some extra cash during the Thanksgiving holiday, poor prep-school student Charlie Simms (Chris O’Donnell) agrees to look after blind — and cantankerous — Lt. Col. Frank Slade (Al Pacino, in a tour-de-force performance). Though the callow student and jaded colonel are mismatched, their relationship grows as Simms follows Slade around Manhattan on a string of wild escapades, and Slade is unmasked as a sentimental romantic.

The major problem with this film is that it isn’t great, mostly due to its long time. The film clocks in at about 2 hours and 37 minutes, making this journey seem forever. There are points where I felt that the scenes went on for too long and could have actually been cut down a long with time. Many scenes seemed very unoriginal, and highly cliched. There is also one random scene with Pacino where he wants to after having a great time, wants to kill himself, and goes crazy. It’s an OK scene, just too out there and not placed well.

This movie has a great way of combining two different stories into make one theme special. The story of this blind veteran, and the story of this young college student who is in trouble at his old school, is actually weaved together quite well. Rather, the issue is making a decision for oneself and sticking by it. This is all done with a deft touch, and intelligent dialogue.

Probably the greatest element to this film is its flawless performance from Pacino. I stated I didn’t like the long running time, but in ways I felt it was suitable just for Pacino to show off his amazing skills like usual. He is funny, intelligent, crazy, and also memorbal, with hilarious lines like “Hooooooo- wahhhhh!!!!!” and “when in doubt, fuck”, Pacino obviously deserved himself that Oscar that he won. O’Donnell is a guy I feel bad for because he doesn’t get up-staged by Pacino, and actually has a couple of good scenes here and there. I just think if he said no to playing Robin, he would still be getting some good roles, and maybe when he’s 50, be in Pacino’s seat. Hey, you never know.

Consensus: Though it runs too long, and some scenes aren’t original, Scent of a Woman is a film that will surely have you effected mostly cause of its heart-felt message, and knock-out performance from Pacino, and a sweet performance from O’Donnell.

8/10=Matinee!!

Far and Away (1992)

Oh, Irish accents never get old.

In Ron Howard’s epic drama, two 19th century Irish immigrants make the journey to the United States together, but for very different reasons. Joseph Donelly (Tom Cruise) is a poor farmer who’s lost everything, while Shannon Christie (Nicole Kidman) is chafing against her privileged but stifling upbringing. Looking for land as they make their way west, they also find love as they endure a series of hardships that strengthens their relationship.

Seeing all the reviewers for this film it was all basically cut in half of some liking it, and some hating it. For me I’m on the first side.

It really is stunning to look at. Many of the set pieces look like the turn of the century right in front of your eyes. I felt like I was there with these people while it was going on. I’am not usually a very big fan of period pieces mostly cause the look isn’t captured very well, but it all looks so real and genuine.There is a final scene at the end that takes place in the Land Run of 1893, and is shot so well with so much detail that it gives you the feeling of being in all that havoc.

I did have some problems with this film still however. The unrelenting Irish stereotypes got annoying, because as usual they just showed them drinking and fighting forget about anything else. I felt like the film could have definitely been better written cause most of the lines are really cheesy, and at the same time not very believable.  The movie is really cornball with its obvious cliche story and is highly predictable.

But most of the praise for this film has to go to Ron Howard who makes this 2 hour and 19 minute adventure seem a lot quicker than the run-time given. He makes sure scenes don’t go over the limit to the point of where they become an annoyance, and stages many scenes, like as I said before, with so much energy and realism that you actually feel like your there.

Tom Cruise as usual is very good here, although he is sporting the fake Irish accent. I kind of felt the same way towards him in this film as I did in The Last Samurai because I can’t quite get past that its Tom Cruise, because he has so much of that star-power, but still nonetheless does a great job anyway. But the real treat here is Kidman mostly because she plays these characters that could be so goofy, but does it with such strength and realism that you actually believe her characters.

Consensus: Far and Away has its obvious cliches and isn’t very believable, but is wonderful to look at, mostly from the fearless direction of Ron Howard, and two great performances from Cruise and Kidman.

6.5/10=Rental!!

A River Runs Through It (1992)

How exciting is fly-fishing after all?

Two fly-fishing brothers, straitlaced scholar Norman (Craig Sheffer) and trouble-finding gambler Paul (Brad Pitt), struggle to mollify their Presbyterian preacher father’s (Tom Skerritt) lofty moral — and fishing — standards. Director Robert Redford’s nostalgic meditation about the fierce bonds that unite and divide families is set in Montana in the early 1900s.

A River Runs Through It is one of those great books that is just so hard to make a film of. One reason because how can you make a film about how fly-fishing is the moral theme for this family over the decades.

But mostly for the effort I have to give the props to Redford as director, because mostly he makes this film have a lot of heart in places that you wouldn’t expect. He captures the heart and nature of the relationship that these two brothers have from childhood up to their adult years and it truly is something to see. The way he shoots the film is really beautiful and keeps you astonished by the images in this film.

The major problem I had with this film is that it was extremley slow and uninteresting at times. With a couple of exceptions, the film never really held my attention for a long period of time mostly cause nothing much really happens except for them talking and fly-fishing which after the 1 hour mark kind of gets annoying.

I liked the screenplay because it was written very poeticaly, but to say the least i kind of knew the whole time where it was going. I think by the end of the film it started to dive into areas that were abandoning its earlier themes, which were mostly all about being a  parent and raising a nice family.

The one better thing about this film is its performances from its two young leads. Sheffer and Pitt both seem like brothers that have grown old together and in every scene capture an essence of growing up and struggling with adulthood. Mostly, Pitt makes his charcater a lot more likable with his signature energy and makes his character the most watched.

Consensus: A River Runs Thrugh It is written and shot inteligently by Redford, but doesn’t have enough going on to fully keep your interest, but still a nice film.

5/10=Rental!!!