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Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

All my aimless thoughts, ideas, and ramblings, all packed into one site!

Tag Archives: Greg Kinnear

Brigsby Bear (2017)

Some shows we just never want to end. Looking at you, Freaks & Geeks.

For as long as he can remember, James Pope (Kyle Mooney)’s life has been run on “Brigsby Bear Adventures”, a children’s program that teaches James about recycling and not masturbating more than twice a day. Weird stuff like that, but hey, James loves it so much that he doesn’t care or even see the weird message. Then, the series abruptly ends and James doesn’t know what to do with himself. And to make matters even worse, he’s moved into a new house, with a new family, and doesn’t quite know how to fit in with the rest of the world around him. Still though, everybody pretty much already accepts him for what he is and they decide that it’s time to help James finish up Brigsby’s final adventure. James hopes it will bring him some closure on the TV series, whereas everybody else hopes that it will allow him to move on and come to terms with the real world.

Blow it up, Brigs!

So yeah, I’m being a little coy about Brigsby Bear because there are some parts of the plot that are kept secret and with good reason: It’s dark. But in a way, it’s shocking and it works; it gives you the idea that this movie’s going to go far and beyond just being another silly, over-the-top indie-comedy about a childish man-baby trying to finish off the final episode to a cult-followed TV show.

It also helps allow for there to be real some tension in the air, even when in reality, there isn’t. There aren’t bad people, or insanely good people in Brigsby Bear and it’s kind of sweet. It’s the kind of movie that cares much more about characters, their relationships to one another, and how they treat the outside world, as opposed to just being all about the plot and riffing on everyday life. Had this movie been taken in the hands of someone like Will Ferrell or Steve Carrel, who knows how centered and focused it would have been.

But without them, and instead, with Kyle Mooney, it’s much far better off.

Never break character.

And that’s why Brigsby Bear, while it could have easily just been a spin-off of Mooney doing goofy and crazy things, like he does on SNL, it’s much different. He has this character that, despite having the general facade of being a weirdo, is actually kind, earnest, and so innocent, he could literally kill a cat and you wouldn’t be upset with him. He’s just getting used to a new world and it’s Mooney’s performance that really works wonders, enthusing a great air of mystery of this character, but also a great deal of sympathy too.

And of course, the same sentiments transcend to the rest of the characters, too. Matt Walsh is funny as the dorky dad who tries to relate to James; Michaela Watkins does the same; Claire Danes, playing probably anything resembling a villain here, is fun to watch; Greg Kinnear’s nice cop role gets better once we discover he’s got a bit of the acting bug; Ryan Simpkins plays James’ sister who seems like she’s going to be an embarrassed pain in the rear-end, but eventually lightens up; Jorge Lendeborg Jr. plays one of James’ friends who seems lik he’s going to be a deuche, only to then not be and probably be the best character in it all; and Mark Hamill and Jane Adams, well, the less said about them, perhaps the better.

Either way, just know that they’re all good, because they’re given characters to work with and not just the sitcom-y kind, either.

Real people, who also seem to be kind of funny to watch.

Consensus: A little odd, but overall, Brigsby Bear is a very funny, sweet, and well-acted comedy that actually takes its time to work.

7 / 10

Brigsby’s mid-life existence.

Photos Courtesy of: Sony Pictures Classics

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Little Men (2016)

Adults ruin all the fun!

After the death of his grandfather, Jake (Theo Taplitz) and his parents move into his apartment complex in Brooklyn. There, he meets Tony (Michael Barbieri) a young Hispanic kid who shares the same fun interests that Jake does and also happens to always be around the area a whole lot. It’s a solid friendship that’s built mostly on their shared love of video-games and acting, but beyond them, there’s something far more serious going on. Jake’s parents, Brian (Greg Kinnear) and Kathy (Jennifer Ehle), have inherited mostly all of what the grandfather had, including the thrift store located underneath them. The thrift store is currently being run and maintained by Tony’s mom, Leonor (Paulina Garcia), who seems perfectly comfortable with her business, even if she knows that her time is going to be quite limited there, what with rent getting higher and higher in the area. Now feeling the push from Brian to pay the necessary amount of rent to stay, Leonor starts to pull Tony further and further away from Jake, leading to the boys giving their parents the silent treatment, as most kids their age are perhaps most known for doing.

"I stubbed my toe!"

“I stubbed my toe!”

The best thing about Little Men is that writer/director Ira Sachs, who I’ve never been quite a huge fan of, never seems to judge a single person in this whole entire movie. Every character here acts in a selfish manner, somehow, none of them are ever seen as “the bad guys”, nor are the others seen as “the good guys”. If anything, everyone here is just a person – they all make their own choices, decisions and matters in life, regardless of whether or not they’re actually the right, or smart ones, to make.

And that’s why, for all of its small, understated moments, Little Men is quite the flick.

It’s the kind that moves at such an efficient pace that you hardly even realize that it’s just barely under-an-hour-an-a-half, but feels way shorter. With his past few movies, Sachs has shown that he’s not afraid to settle things down with his plots and keep them as languid as humanly possible, but because of that, they tend to just be boring. Here, it’s very different; with what feels like it was a very quick-shoot, with barely any time to waste, Sachs creates a very quick, but meaningful tale of growing up and also, getting older.

See, if anything, Little Men is a coming-of-ager that’s actually painfully honest about getting older and trying to see the world, not just through your own, rapidly maturing eyes, but through your parent’s as well. Sachs does a smart job of showing us not only why this situation is bad for the two kids at the center of the flick, but why it’s bad for all of the parents, too; after all, they are the ones who are having this disagreement, not the little ones. How this one situation affects just about everyone around them is important and more specifically, handled so well by Sachs, who seems to give each and every character some sort of detail that makes them more inherently interesting as the time goes by.

It’s also the cast who are all quite great, too, especially the kids at the center.

Cheer up, parents. You've still got the second generation to think about here.

Cheer up, parents. You’ve still got the second generation to think about here.

While I’ve never seen them in anything before, both Theo Taplitz and Michael Barbieri are great here and not only feel like actual, real life kids, but their friendship is an interesting one that could have definitely been its own movie, what without all of the parents bickering at one another happening on the sidelines. Taplitz is just the right amount of dorky and artsy, whereas Barbieri is just the right amount of brass and sharp, but together, they actually do work as pals; they both have a love for acting that shines through in a great scene, but they also seem to get along whenever they aren’t focusing on acting. Sachs perfectly shows what it’s like to get to know someone when you’re young and just figuring yourself out, while at the same time, figuring out how that fellow person is going to factor into your life as you get older. It’s a beautiful relationship that, yes, at times does seem like it’s going to lean into some sexual areas, but surprisingly, doesn’t.

It’s just sweet and nostalgic.

As for the older folks in the cast, they all do fine jobs. Greg Kinnear turns in a very raw performance as Jake’s downtrodden dad, Jennifer Ehle is good as the psychiatrist mom who may think a little too hard, Talia Balsam is good as the snarky, sometimes mean-spirited aunt, and Paulina Garcia, as Jake’s mom, does a nice job, but her role is the one I had the most problem with, the same as I had with Naomie Harris’ in Moonlight. As Leonor, Garcia has a tough role in that she has to be a little unsympathetic, yet, at the same time, still sympathetic to us, if that makes any sense. The role is there for her to take, but for some reason, I couldn’t help but thinking that Garcia downplays the role way too much; when she should be engaging in some sort of conversation with the characters who are speaking to her, she just sits away, smokes her cigarettes, and then breaks into random, unbelievable monologues.

She reminded me of a femme fatale that you’d find in a noir, as opposed to a small, intimate indie, where real people talk, act and exist. Garcia was great in Gloria and Narcos, which makes me disappointed to see that her role, while clearly important, also feels like the most unbelievable aspect of the whole thing. Maybe I’m expecting too much, but I don’t think that I am: When your whole movie is based on the realistic look and feel, it’s hard to really accept the moments where something doesn’t ring true and just feels like a writer, well, writing.

Consensus: With a smart direction and cast, Little Men is an interesting, emotional and sometimes relateable tale of growing up, not just for kids, but for parents as well.

8.5 / 10

Kids, man. They're literally the future.

Kids, man. They’re literally the future.

Photos Courtesy of: Indiewire

Confirmation (2016)

Note to self: Keep Coca-Cola cans away from possible sex-deviants.

In 1991, President George H. W. Bush nominated Clarence Thomas (Wendell Pierce) for the Supreme Court of the United States to replace Thurgood Marshall, who was getting ready for retirement. This decision was ultimately met with loads and loads of controversy, with some seeing it as a racial issue, with others just seeing Thomas as not the right guy for the job. One person who ultimately didn’t give it another thought, until she was brought back into it all, was Anita Hill (Kerry Washington). Hill worked as a secretary for Thomas some few years back and while she had certain issues with him, she never bothered telling the press or anything. What she wanted to do was keep it to herself, keep her job, and just live a simple, quiet life, teaching the law to college kids. However, once the word gets out that Hill will be making a statement against Thomas for sexual harassment, the press lights up, accusing her, as well as him for all sorts of things. There’s a whole bunch of players at work with the case, but the one most importantly is Joe Biden (Greg Kinnear) who, at the time, was working as Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, and also struggles with calling every decision right down the middle, and also remembering not to tarnish the good name of the United States of America.

It's all about the hair-pieces.

It’s all about the hair-pieces.

There’s no denying the importance of the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings. While Hill herself lost the hearings and was basically held out to dry by all of her fellow colleagues and confidantes, there’s no denying that, after the fact, it spearheaded a movement in which more women, and especially those of color, testifying to sexual harassment issues and were granted positions of power that they deserved. And in today’s day and age, nearly 25 years later, the case is still relevant to a lot of the issues what women most go through, not just in the workforce, but in general.

But for some reason, Confirmation is hardly important. If anything, it’s just an overdone, overcooked, well-acted, and dramatic re-telling of the events that transpired within and around the Anita Hill hearings – the kind that HBO are most known for creating. While I’m all for Anita Hill getting the attention she deserves, what’s interesting is that Confirmation doesn’t just focus the story on her, but instead, decide to look elsewhere.

Perhaps most surprisingly is that it actually asks us to somewhat sympathize with someone like Clarence Thomas.

And in Confirmation, it’s clear that Thomas may have been possibly attacked out of nowhere and wrongly. After all, it’s not Anita Hill herself who comes forth with the story of her and Thomas, but instead, it’s government agencies wanting dig up some dirt on Thomas himself and figure out if they can bury him as soon as possible, or keep him around and gain respect. In a way, you could make the argument that Thomas was randomly attacked, but at the same time, there’s no denying that Thomas did something wrong, in that he sexually harassed an employee of his.

I don’t care which way you paint it, but there’s no way I’m going to sympathize with someone like that.

But Thomas isn’t the only one who gets an unfavorable light shined on him. Another famous political figure here is Joe Biden, as played by Greg Kinnear, and while it initially seems like the movie is going to take a surprisingly hard-headed approach to him, the movie decides to back out of that original plan. Instead of showing Biden to bit of a coward during the hearings (which, if you watch the footage, he was), the movie tries to show him as just a puppet, who’s strings were pulled and prodded by some very powerful puppeteers. Honestly, this may be at least some bit of the truth, but there’s no denying the fact that Biden, at this point in time, acted in an unprofessional and despicable manner, and to not put a greater focus on that fact, almost seems like the creators making an apology for him, if only because they support him now.

The look of a guilty, if very horny man.

The look of a guilty, if very horny man.

All political issues aside, it doesn’t matter – Biden, as well as everyone else surrounding him, acted in a wrongful manner. And yes, this is exactly what Confirmation shows, in an over-sensationalized way and manner – aka, the kind that HBO has always been known for doing and can, on occasion, really work well with. The issue here is that a lot of what would be interesting and thought-provoking about this case, these people and what transpired, instead just seems like a point-by-point coverage. With something like the People vs. O.J. Simpson, we’re not just getting a retelling of the case and all of the people involved with it, but were also getting a closer, more detailed look inside the lives and instances that actually occurred.

Here, with Confirmation, it just seems like something you’d be able to hear through a power point presentation.

Sure, having a stacked and well-acted cast like this is definitely appealing and allows for some of these people to appear more than just famous figures, but does it really matter when all you’re doing is just using them as points? Everybody here does their thing, but nobody’s ever really allowed to rise beyond the material, especially considering that a lot of it is just covering certain bases that many people already know about.

If anything, just watch the documentary Anita. It paints a better portrait of the woman, the case and everybody else involved with this travesty.

Consensus: Despite a solid cast, Confirmation can’t help but feel like a dramatic retelling of a story most of us know by now, but with barely any new, or interesting avenues taken.

5.5 / 10

Why nobody else has tried to bring that dress back into the fashion world is beyond me.

Why nobody else has tried to bring that quaint, little dress back into the fashion world is beyond me.

Photos Courtesy of: Indiewire

Baby Mama (2008)

Who doesn’t have baby mama drama?

Kate (Tina Fey) is a businesswoman who, for the most part, has been pleased with her life thus far. She has a good job, a nice apartment in Philadelphia, and generally considers her life simple and easygoing enough that she doesn’t have to worry about too much. Problem is, there’s one thing that she really wants to do with her life that sadly, she may not be able to do: Have a child. Due to her being infertile, Kate has not been able to, no matter how hard she has tried, to naturally have a child; so, she takes the next best step in the matter, which leads her to becoming apart of a surrogacy program. In the surrogacy program, for those who don’t know what that means, Kate’s baby will, through sperm injections and all sorts of other medical shenanigans, be conceived and born through some other woman. This other woman in question just so happens to be Angie (Amy Poehler), someone who is definitely not at all like Kate. Which is fine for Kate, so long as she can trust Angie to be smart about her body and realize that there is indeed a human growing inside of her. But after Angie runs into issues with her own husband (Dax Shepard), she begins to live with Kate, which is when the two begin to learn more about one another, even if they also have differences as well.

Tina doesn't need Greg Kinnear in her life, but hey, she'll take him!

Tina doesn’t need Greg Kinnear in her life, but hey, she’ll take him! And you know why? ‘Cause she can!

Of course, in Baby Mama, wacky hijinx ensue. That’s obvious from the very start, however, Baby Mama is a tad bit smarter than most of the other broad comedies out there that would have attacked this premise as dumb as possible. This isn’t, of course, to say that Baby Mama isn’t predictable, by-the-numbers, or at least, conventional, because it’s each and everyone of those things – but working behind all of those conventions and obvious story-structures is, for one, laughs, and also, a decent-sized heart that reminds you that you’re watching a female-lead comedy, that can appeal to basically everyone.

Sure, it may definitely help if you’re a woman or going through the same life event as the one depicted here, but regardless, it doesn’t matter.

Baby Mama is, first and foremost, a comedy. And a funny one at that. Most of that comes from the fact that both Tina Fey and Amy Poehler have such great chemistry between one another, that it’s hard not to get wrapped-up in the fun and enjoyment they clearly have playing side-by-side. Even though their characters are, obviously, general opposites, not just in terms of personality, but also in social backgrounds, you still get the feeling that Fey and Poehler can’t wait for that moment in this film where their characters start to put all of their issues aside, take some shots, get wild together, and generally, have fun together.

To say that Fey and Poehler are both funny here, is doing them justice. However, there’s also another element to their performances that factor in well and that’s that their characters are actually well-written, despite initially seeming like stupid and dull caricatures from the beginning. Like, for instance, try Fey’s Kate: While she appears to be a stuck-up, way-too-serious businesswoman who is all about her job and not much else, eventually, the story goes on and we see that there’s actually a lot more fun and excitement to her life. Heck, the reasons for why she wants a baby to begin with, regardless of whether it’s naturally or through agencies, are understandable; she’s gotten to that point in her life where she wants one, she doesn’t need one, but wants one.

It's set in Philadelphia, so of course the bell-hop is a token black guy!

It’s set in Philadelphia, so of course the bell-hop is a token black guy! Gotta love my city!

That is, most of all, perhaps the greatest distinction this movie makes and is truly a smart piece of writing. It shows that woman like Kate, whether they be successful or not, don’t need to have babies to make their lives feel fulfilled. Does that mean that they’re not nice to have around? Of course not, but Baby Mama doesn’t believe that in order to make sure that your life is great and superb, it needs to be so with a baby by your side. It’s a small piece of writing, I know, but it’s what sets it apart from most other female-driven comedies out there that are all about getting married and having kids, because of some ill-conceived notion from many, many years ago, that says women need a certain amount of requirements to make their lives great.

But still, seriousness aside, Baby Mama is still a fine comedy.

Like what I said for Fey’s Kate, can be said the same for Poehler’s Angie: She may seem a bit white trash-y, but after awhile, the movie just shows her more off as a wild girl who not only likes to have some fun, but also wants to be a bit more serious in her own life as well. She doesn’t need to be serious, but she wants to be. There are others in this movie that show up in this movie that are funny, charming and welcome, but it’s really Poehler and Fey who make the movie work the most.

Even though the movie does admittedly get a bit syrupy and sentimental by the end, Poehler and Fey still feel fun and fresh, adding another sense of enjoyment to the proceedings. The plot does eventually get to be a bit too much and be about things happening, one after another, with random twists coming out left and right, but regardless, Baby Mama can still be funny and at times, relatively insightful. It may not be trying too hard, but in its own way, it sort of is; it’s taking the female-driven comedy and doing something with it that isn’t revolutionary or game-changing, but normal.

And hey, there’s nothing at all wrong with that.

Consensus: Predictable and lightweight for sure, but regardless, Baby Mama still offers up plenty of laughs and enjoyment courtesy of Poehler and Fey’s lovely chemistry.

7 / 10

Does this tend to happen? Ladies?

Does this tend to happen? Ladies?

Photo’s Credit to: IMDB, AceShowbiz

Nurse Betty (2000)

NurseBettyposterThe bigger question is: Why the hell do people still watch soap operas?

Betty Sizemore (Renée Zellweger) is a lovely, young woman from Kansas who is simple, loves her hubby (Aaron Eckhart), and loves to watch her favorite show, the popular daytime TV drama A Reason to Love. Betty is such a nice girl, that it’s almost insane to see what happens to her when her hubby is killed by two drug-dealers (Morgan Freeman and Chris Rock), and then decides to flee the scene of the crime, in order to find and locate her favorite character from that show, Doctor David Ravell (Greg Kinnear). Problem is, Betty is so disillusioned as to what the hell is going on that she doesn’t see David Ravell as a character from a show, but an actual character in real-life. Yep, she’s nutso!

It may came as sort of a shock to some of you out there, but this flick was actually directed by Neil LaBute, way before he started hanging out with Nicolas Cage and bees. However, this one wasn’t written by him but still features a lot of his trademarks: d-bag characters, dark humor, a bit of misogyny, and a double-entendre’s galore!

You know, what everybody loathes and loves about LaBute’s pieces of work.

They don't make cardboard cut-outs like they used to.

They don’t make cardboard cut-outs quite like they used to.

With this movie, we’re able to see that LaBute has a funny bone and even though none of his actual trademarks are here as a director or writer, we still get a feel for the guy and the type of material he likes thrown at him. Later in his career, that wouldn’t do much to help him, but before it all went downhill, LaBute was a pretty big, freakin’ deal at one point and it’s flicks like these that show why. While you’re laughing, you’ll actually find yourself following a story that’s clever, but is also very informative in the twists and turns it takes and at times, you may not know whether you should or shouldn’t laugh at what’s going on.

Yeah, it gets pretty serious, pretty quick.

Which, to say the least, can sort of be the problem, tonally speaking. Don’t get me wrong, it was a bunch of fun that made me laugh, feel suspense, and question these characters and their motivations, but the tone felt a bit off to me. This is apparently clear especially around the last-act where, all of a sudden, we have characters shooting one another, murdering, bleeding, trying to save fish (once you see the film, it will make sense), and people yelling out for their loved-ones. It’s all very drastic, serious, and actually scary, considering we’ve spent so much time with these characters and all that they do, and now we actually have the possibility of seeing them be killed-off, in front of our eyes, is a pretty freaky sight. Not to always say that this movie’s most glaring problem is it’s tone, but when it doesn’t work, it shows and seems like the writers of this flick (John C. Richards and James Flamburg) may have needed a bit of LaBute-flavor to spice things up. Then again, that’s just the way I feel.

After Death at a Funeral, I don’t know what to believe anymore, but a comeback of sorts is clearly is in-store for Mr. LaBute.

I just know it!

But aside from that, everything else is pretty stellar about this movie, especially the cast. One of the biggest and best aspects of this flick, is Ms. Renée Zellweger as Betty Sizemore, our lovable klutz for the next two-hours. Say what you will about Zellweger, her scrunched-up face, her random marriage to Jack White, and her obvious, public drunkenness at the Oscars, the gal is one hell of a charmer and shows that she can make any character work, especially one that’s so strange like this. The fact that Betty is all in a daze and believes everything she sees is real, and not fictional like her favorite TV show, is more than enough to poke-fun at a character and make her seem like a total nut of a person, but Zellweger makes her more than that. She’s got a beautiful smile, a nice look to her, and is actually a sweet person, once you get past the fact that she’s a bit too cuckoo for Coco Puffs. But still, the movie plays off of her with such ease and Zellweger is more than up to the challenge when it comes to that. Without her and her earnestness, I don’t know quite how well this role, hell, this movie would have worked.

If this was the South, they'd be more than just fucked. They'd be dead.

“Next time, no driving Ms. Daisy.”

Morgan Freeman and Chris Rock play the two dudes that are after her, and work very well together, despite them seeming like an odd-match at first. Rock is the straight-laced, comedic-man that is more like the voice of reason, whereas Freeman is the down-and-out hitman, that’s on his last job, wants to retire, and is starting to see more visions than he ever planned on, sort of like Betty in a way. Both have this odd-contrast between the two, but still do well at showing how goofy they can be, but also still have you a bit scared of what they could do next.

Greg Kinnear is also a nice fit as Dr. David Ravell, aka the person his character in this movie plays on the show that Betty loves to watch (make any sense?). What I liked about Kinnear is that he’s a bit of a dick because he’s a famous star that mostly older-housewives love, and seems to have it all go to his head. Yet, still respects and loves Betty for the fact that she’s able to be “in character” the whole time that they chat, but little does he know: She’s serious. Dead serious, in fact. It’s fun to see him play that idea up as we all know Kinnear is more than capable of playing a deuche.

He’s just got that look, I hate to say.

Consensus: While going through a few tonal issues, Nurse Betty still works as a dark, twisted, but surprisingly funny piece of LaBute fiction that may not have his trademark style, but still seems up the same alley.

7 / 10

Oh yeah, and he's a dick in this too. Much of a surprise to no one.

Oh yeah, and he’s a dick in this too. Not much of a surprise to any one.

Photo’s Credit to: Thecia.Com.Au

Green Zone (2010)

If Jason Bourne suddenly turned into Rambo.

U.S. Defense Intelligence Agent Clark Poundstone (Greg Kinnear) doesn’t want to hear what Army Chief Warrant Officer Roy Miller (Matt Damon) has to say about not finding the weapons of mass destruction — evidence that could launch a war — he’s been sent to Iraq to unearth. Why the cover-up?

Director Paul Greengrass has teamed up with Matt Damon many of times on the big-screen with the Jason Bourne films, and as this film does look like a “Jason Bourne goes to Iraq” picture, it never gets as cool as it was going to look.

Probably my problem with this film was that it’s camera was all over the place. Greengrass is known for using hand-held cameras to create this realistic and gritty feel, but there are parts where this film gets so shaky, that I had to actually advert my eyes away from the screen just so I wouldn’t puke. There was also many moments where I couldn’t even tell what was going on. The action was good, especially by the last 15 minutes, but there wasn’t enough to keep me watching.

Green Zone’s writing is also kind of lame. I wish there was a little bit more poignancy to this film, rather than just all this military talk, and war battle sequences. We never get a real message, or even insight into the life of a soldier here, and that kind of took me away from this film, because then I just saw this as being an action thriller and nothing else, even though it was trying to be more.

Sometimes when you see certain actors in a role that Matt Damon is in, they just aren’t believable but he does a great job. Whether he’s questioning superiors, or giving orders, Matt Damon sounds completely natural speaking in the language of a militarist. He doesn’t try to be too cute, he just acts like an action movie star should. Greg Kinnear is basically the main bad-guy in this film, and does a good job but he doesn’t get that many scenes to prove it, which kind of bummed me out cause I was just waiting to see the brothers from Stuck On You go at it. Brendan Gleeson, Amy Ryan, and Jason Isaacs also show up here doing their things, but not that much time to show anything more.

Consensus: Green Zone has some action that will keep you over, along with some good performances from the cast, but the script doesn’t really go anywhere, and just gives us action film cliches.

5/10=Rental!!

Ghost Town (2008)

Imagine Ghost, but with more comedy.

British funnyman Ricky Gervais (“The Office,” “Extras”) stars in his first feature film lead as Bertram Pincus, a hapless gent who’s pronounced dead, only to be brought back to life with an unexpected gift: a newfound ability to see ghosts. When Bertram crosses paths with the recently departed Frank Herlihy (Greg Kinnear), he gets pulled into Frank’s desperate bid to break up his widowed wife’s (Téa Leoni) pending marriage to another man.

This film is basically one that you probably haven’t heard of. And thats a real darn shame, cause your missing out on something great.

Ghost Town has the obvious romantic comedy cliches that over-load the film early on, and never really stop coming on. It has that It’s a Wonderful Life or Christmas Carol feeling, but with a lot more obvious cliches.

But that is the only problem with this film. Other than that I found this to be a great blend of comedy, romance, and ghosts, and I thought I’d never have to say that again. Writer-director David Koepp does a wonderful job of adding enough dark, and sometimes dry comedy without making it too smart for you not to understand. Also, the film is not just a romantic comedy all the way through, by the end there are actually some good tear-jerking dramatic scenes, mostly cause you are dealing with dead people. The comedy along with its drama is tender and sweet although I will say it is very predictable.

Gervais does great in his American debut role, and acts like a complete dick throughout the whole beginning and by the end you start to like him. His dry sense of humor and deliverance is perfect for this role, and I actually think a lot of his own ad-libs got Leoni actually laughing, and not just a script laugh. Kinnear is good but I couldn’t find whether or not to trust this guy, cause at times we found he was a dick then other times we found he wasn’t.

Consensus: Ghost Town may be highly predictable, but has great dialogue filled with enough of hilarious comedy, and tear-jerking dramatic scenes, and a great lead performance from Gervais.

8.5/10=Matinee!!!

The Matador (2005)

The ultimate cocktail date.

When a traveling salesman, Danny Wright, accidentally meets up with Julian Noble, a hit man, at a Mexico City bar, their subsequent evening together intertwines their lives in an unexpected, but lasting bond.

The film has a pretty simple premise and could have easily turned into a screwball comedy or a run-of-the-mill action flick, but it didn?t do either. It’s interesting reading the reviews for this movie because they run at either end of the spectrum. Everyone seems to love it or hate it. I have to admit I just liked it. Didn’t love it, didn’t hate it.

I enjoyed the colorful cinematography and thought it brought up a lighter tone to some more of the serious and dark moments. There is also a twist at the end of the story but soon then after that we find a twist to that twist and it all comes together in the end, and that is something to see in this film.

Most of the praising has to go the performances to its two leads, mostly Pierce Brosnon. Brosnon gives a very strong performance, and is the ultimate strong point of the film. I read someone say this could be his best roll ever. I thought about this for a little while and thinking about all the movies he had been in and that just might be a very accurate statement. He buries the Bond character with this film playing the same guy but more of a human-like one. This person has regrets for his actions, and he does have feelings about what he does. This career-saving role from Brosnon totally buries his character as James Bond. Also Greg Kinnear does a great job as the square salesman who is resents Brosnon’s character but also envy’s him and the way he is about things in life.

Though I do believe this does have problems in places. The film’s whole story and moral comes into play by the end of the film and is not as engaging as it could’ve been in throughout the whole story. Some viewers may find this too dragged on and boring. Also without the great deliverance from the actors I think the script would’ve been the ultimate downfall of the film. The film’s script isn’t very witty and does not have great hilarious moments but the actors make it seem like that and it’s hilarious.

The film doesn’t have a great screenplay but Brosnon makes this film great with his incredible performance that makes me think twice of him now.

8/10=Matinee!!!